Monthly Archives: April 2007

Guggenheim fellowships awarded to ten Press authors

April 6, 2007
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Guggenheim fellowships awarded to ten Press authors

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has released its list of 2007 Fellows and we are pleased to find that ten University of Chicago Press authors have received fellowships. According to the Guggenheim website, “the Guggenheim Fellowship program helps to provide Fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible.” Recipients include: Shadi Bartsch, author of The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire, and co-editor of Erotikon: Essays on Eros, Ancient and Modern Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi, author of By Words Alone: The Holocaust in Literature Michael Gorra, author of After Empire: Scott, Naipaul, Rushdie Verlyn Klinkenborg, author of The Last Fine Time Margaretta M. Lovell, author of A Visitable Past: Views of Venice by American Artists, 1860-1915 Michael McCann, author of Rights at Work: Pay Equity Reform and the Politics of Legal Mobilization Mary Louise Roberts, author of Civilization without Sexes: Reconstructing Gender in Postwar France, 1917-1927, and Disruptive Acts: The New Woman in Fin-de-Siecle France Laurie Shannon, author of Sovereign Amity: Figures of Friendship in Shakespearean Contexts Kay Kaufman Shelemay, author of Let Jasmine Rain Down: Song and Remembrance among Syrian Jews David . . .

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Press Release: Longenbach, Draft of a Letter

April 6, 2007
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Press Release: Longenbach, Draft of a Letter

Draft of a Letter is a book about belief—not belief in the unknowable but belief in what seems bewilderingly plain. Pondering the bodies we inhabit, the words we speak, these poems discover infinitude in the most familiar places. The revelation is disorienting and, as a result, these poems talk to themselves, revise themselves, fashioning a dialogue between self and soul that opens outward to include other voices, lovers, children, angels, and ghosts. For James Longenbach, great distance makes the messages we send sweeter. To be divided from ourselves is never to be alone. “If the kingdom is in the sky,” says the body to the soul, “Birds will get there before you.” “In time,” says the awakening soul, “I liked my second / Body better / Than the first.” To live, these poems insist, is to arise every day to the strange magnificence of the people and places we thought we knew best. Draft of a Letter is an unsettled and radiant paradiso, imagined in the death-shadowed, birth-haunted middle of a long life. Read the press release. . . .

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Press Release: Boyers, Honey with Tobacco

April 6, 2007
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Press Release: Boyers, Honey with Tobacco

Hard Bread, Peg Boyers’s debut poetry collection, with verse spoken in the imagined voice of the Italian writer Natalia Ginzburg, was widely praised for its inspired ventriloquism and brilliant lyricism. In Honey with Tobacco, Boyers’s own intensely personal voice emerges in three strikingly distinctive variants. The first part of the book is the most explicitly autobiographical, bringing together poems that explore the poet’s Cuban American experience and a childhood marked by travel, the tropics, and varieties of disenchantment. The middle sequence of poems concerns a mother, a father, and a son, a postmodern holy family whose ordeals are evoked in a terse, terrifying narrative. The final section of the book confronts age, desire, and regret in a series of personal poems that plumb baser human instincts and the speakers’ determination to dwell in darkness, when necessary, without abandoning the sacred. Read the press release. . . .

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Review: Attlee, Isolarion

April 4, 2007
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Review: Attlee, Isolarion

From the UK comes another review of Isolarion: A Different Oxford Journey by James Attlee, this one in the Times. The review praises Attlee’s unconventional travelogue for turning his observations about Oxford’s Cowley Road—an unexplored side-street just minutes from the author’s home—into a fascinating journey across space and time. From Elizabeth Garner’s review: On the surface, Isolarion plays with the thrill of voyeurism. We follow Attlee behind closed doors into unknown worlds: from New Age immersion in a flotation tank to the brash neon-lit world of the porn shop, to the smoky, hypnotic experience of a reggae concert. … But Isolarion is more than a piece of observational journalism. Attlee’s encounters lead to thoughtful investigations of the human condition. A visit to a jewellers allows a digression on love and love tokens. A vivid, sensual description of a street carnival becomes an insight into multiculturalism, and blends into a meditation on the nature of family. … Ultimately, weaves together a subtle, understated tale of spiritual survival: peace and understanding come from an investigation of where we are. In an age in which air travel opens up the world, and holidays are to escape the mundane, Attlee encourages us to . . .

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Eric Muller challenges racial detention

April 3, 2007
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Eric Muller challenges racial detention

As reported by Nina Bernstein in the New York Times today, Eric L. Muller is filing an amicus curiae brief in the case of Turkmen v. Ashcroft, a class-action lawsuit by Muslim immigrants who were swept up and held on alleged immigration violations in the wake of the attacks of September 11. Muller wrote the brief on behalf of Karen Korematsu-Haigh, Jay Hirabayashi, and Holly Yasui, children of the three Japanese Americans who unsuccessfully challenged racial curfew and detention in court during World War II (Korematsu v. United States). According to the story in the Times, the amicus brief argues that the ruling by a federal district judge in New York in 2006 “overlooks the nearly 20-year-old declaration by the United States Congress and the president of the United States that the racially selective detention of Japanese aliens during World War II was a ‘fundamental injustice’ warranting an apology and the payment of reparations.” Eric Muller has a posting about the brief on his blog. He is the author of Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II. We have an excerpt from his book. . . .

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Press Release: Hayek, The Road to Serfdom

April 2, 2007
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Press Release: Hayek, The Road to Serfdom

A founding document of modern libertarianism, Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom has in the sixty years since its publication established itself as an unimpeachable classic in political philosophy, intellectual and cultural history, and economics. From the moment of its publication in 1944, when Hayek’s passionate warnings about the dangers of collectivism and centralized government ran directly counter to prevailing opinion, The Road to Serfdom has inspired and infuriated politicians, scholars, and general readers. It became a surprise best seller in the year of its release, and it has continued to exercise tremendous influence on political and economic thought ever since. The publication of this new, authoritative edition of The Road to Serfdom will allow adherents and detractors alike to seriously reflect on Hayek, reconsider his legacy, and appraise his continuing relevance in the twenty-first century. Read the press release. Read an excerpt on the publishing history of the book. . . .

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