Monthly Archives: December 2009

Quote of the Week: Stephen Toulmin

December 11, 2009
By
Quote of the Week: Stephen Toulmin

Our intellectual grasp extends throughout the cosmos, and has brought to light the material processes going on at every scale-from the themonuclear furnaces of the stars, down through the protein-factories of the cytoplasm, to the changes of wave-pattern which take place when an atom swallows a photon. And this intellectual grasp is paralleled and completed when we turn to the practical sphere. We have exceeded the dreams of the craftsmen, the alchemists and the medicine-men, and by now we have the means either to satiate or to destroy ourselves. from The Architecture of Matter Stephen Edelston Toulmin—philosopher, educator, and author—passed away last Friday, the fourth of December, 2009 at the age of 87. . . .

Read more »

Pure Food and Financial Protection

December 9, 2009
By
Pure Food and Financial Protection

Many of the nation’s financial problems in the last few years have at least some of their roots in the mismanagement of personal finance. Some blame the fiscal hubris of consumers and speculators who bit off more than they could chew. Others blame industry, claiming that many corporations and lenders have made it a common practice to dupe consumers into making unwise investments—from mortgage brokers failing to inform their clients of the full terms of their loan repayment plans, to volatile interest rates and hidden fees on credit card debit. Yet others blame both—while a public consumer culture that encourages irresponsible spending may be partially to blame, the recession has also provided ample evidence on which to base a solid argument for increased consumer protection standards against predatory corporate practices as well. In a recent article for the American Prospect, Larry Glickman author of Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism in America discusses Barak Obama’s proposed Consumer Financial Protection Agency (CFPA) and the history of government policy designed to protect the consumer. From the The Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906, to the Truth in Lending and Fair Labeling and Packaging Acts of the 70s, Glickman’s article demonstrates . . .

Read more »

Stephen Edelston Toulmin, 1922-2009

December 9, 2009
By
Stephen Edelston Toulmin, 1922-2009

Stephen Edelston Toulmin—philosopher, educator, and author—passed away last Friday, the fourth of December, 2009 at the age of 87. A highly influential figure in his field, Toulmin held distinguished professorships at numerous universities including including Columbia, Dartmouth, Michigan State, Northwestern, Stanford, USC and Chicago, where he was a professor in the Committee on Social Thought from 1973 to 1986. Throughout his distinguished career Toulmin also produced a number of important works on ethics, international relations, the history and philosophy of the physical and social sciences, and the history of ideas. Some of these include The Uses of Argument, Wittgenstein’s Vienna (with Alan Janik), The Architecture of Matter, and Cosmopolis: The Hidden Agenda of Modernity, the latter two of which which the press is proud to have published in 1982 and 1990 respectively. Other books by Toulmin published by the press include: The Discovery of Time and The Fabric of the Heavens: The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics. Read the obituary notice on the University of Southern California’s website. . . .

Read more »

“Picturing the Studio,” Dec. 11—Feb. 13 at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

December 8, 2009
By
“Picturing the Studio,” Dec. 11—Feb. 13 at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Beginning with a reception this Friday, December 11th at 4:30 pm at the Art Institute of Chicago’s Sullivan Galleries and running through February 13, 2010, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago presents “Picturing the Studio“—an exhibition exploring “the richly complex politically- and psychologicaly-charged notion of the artist’s studio today… with works by over 30 artists spanning the past two decades… including several specially designed installations undertaken by artists on site.” Curated by Michelle Grabner, (SAIC), and Annika Marie, (Columbia College), featured artists include: Jan Bas Ader, Conrad Bakker, John Baldessari, Stephanie Brooks, Ivan Brunetti, Ann Craven, Julian Dashper, Dana DeGuilio, Susanne Doremus, Joe Fig, Dan Fischer, Julia Fish, Nicholas Frank, Alicia Frankovich, Judith Geichman, Rodney Graham, Karl Haendel, Shane Huffman, Barbara Kasten, Matt Keegan, Daniel Lavitt, Daniel; Adelheid Mers, Tom Moody, Bruce Nauman, Paul Nudd, Leland Rice, David Robbins, Kay Rosen, Amanda Ross-Ho, Carrie Schneider, Roman Signer, Amy Sillman, Frances Stark, Nicholas Steindorf, and James Welling. In conjunction with the School of the Art Institute the University of Chicago press is also pleased to announce the forthcoming companion volume to the exhibition, The Studio Reader: On the Space of Artists edited by Mary Jane Jacob and Michelle Grabner. . . .

Read more »

Quote of the Week: Yves Bonnefoy

December 4, 2009
By
Quote of the Week: Yves Bonnefoy

(And here a snowflake lingers, our eyes follow it, We would love to look at it forever, Here another falls upon the open hand.   And here another, slower and as though lost, goes off, Turns about, then comes back. And isn’t this to say That a word, yet another word, still to be invented, Might redeem the world? But one never knows If this word is heard or only dreamed of.) — from Yves Bonnefoy’s New and Selected Poems Yves Bonnefoy, celebrated translator and critic, is widely considered the most important and influential French poet since World War II. Named to the College de France in 1981 to fill the chair left vacant by the death of Roland Barthes, Bonnefoy was the first poet honored in this way since Paul Valery. Winner of many awards, including the Prix Goncourt in 1987 and the Hudson Review‘s Bennett Award in 1988, he is the author of six critically acclaimed books of poetry. Spanning four decades and drawing on all of Bonnefoy’s major collections, New and Selected Poems provides a comprehensive overview of and an ideal introduction to his work. Also by Yves Bonnefoy from the University of Chicago Press: Act and . . .

Read more »

The Young and the Bloodless

December 3, 2009
By
The Young and the Bloodless

Got blood? Anyone that has been anywhere near a bookstore, a multiplex, or a television lately knows that vampires—those undead creatures of the night—are hot, even though their skin might be cold. Between Stephenie Meyer’s blockbuster Twilight novels (and their big-screen incarnations—the second film in the franchise, New Moon, has earned nearly $500 million worldwide in an astonishing 12 days) and HBO’s original series True Blood (based on Charlaine Harris’s novels), dead is the new black. But how do these modern vampires stack up against the classics? We asked Nina Auerbach, author of Our Vampires, Ourselves (which argues that every age embraces the vampire it needs, and gets the vampire it deserves), why Edward Cullen and Bill Compton are so popular. Read her fascinating response below: When I was young, vampires were old; they were gorged with history as well as blood. Now, they’ve turned young and innocent, while I’ve become, er, ripe, if not quite old. When I was a teen-ager—and even later, when I wrote Our Vampires, Ourselves—I loved Dracula for his evil powers, but now teenagers seem to love Undead Edward, the prudish hero of the long Twilight series, for his virtuous inhibitions. Smoldering through high school . . .

Read more »

Get Headless Males Make Great Lovers for free

December 3, 2009
By
Get Headless Males Make Great Lovers for free

For December’s free e-book of the month we are pleased to offer Marty Crump’s fascinating collection of essays on curious creatures and their amazing behaviors in Headless Males Make Great Lovers: And Other Unusual Natural Histories. In five thematic chapters, Marty Crump—a tropical field biologist well known for her work with the reproductive behavior of amphibians—examines the bizarre conduct of animals as they mate, parent, feed, defend themselves, and communicate. Crump’s enthusiasm for the unusual behaviors she describes—from sex change and free love in sponges to aphrodisiac concoctions in bats—is visible on every page, thanks to her skilled storytelling, which makes even sea slugs, dung beetles, ticks, and tapeworms fascinating and appealing. Steeped in biology, Headless Males Make Great Lovers points out that diverse and unrelated animals often share seemingly bizarre behaviors—evidence, Crump argues, that these natural histories, though outwardly weird, are successful ways of living. Also check out Crump’s follow up to Headless Males, Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers: & Other Unusual Relationships or her account of her quest through the Costa Rican rain forests to collect data on the now extinct Golden Frog in her previous work from the press, In Search of the Golden Frog, both currently . . .

Read more »

A new fiction imprint from Northern Illinois University Press

December 2, 2009
By
A new fiction imprint from Northern Illinois University Press

Good news from the world of publishing isn’t easy to come by, so a new outlet for Midwestern writers of literary fiction is a welcome development. Thus we tip our collective hats to our good friends at Northern Illinois University Press and their new imprint Switchgrass Books, which debuts with Season of Water and Ice by Michigan writer Donald Lystra and Beautiful Piece by Joseph G. Peterson, who we are pleased to count a colleague here at the Press. Set somewhere in Chicago during the 1995 Chicago heat wave, Peterson’s noirish novel is the gritty, hallucinatory story of a risky relationship and its inevitable, chilling climax. Meanwhile, Lystra’s book tracks the life of young Danny DeWitt and his father as they struggle with issues of love and family in rural northern Michigan in the 1950’s. Set side by side Switchgrass’s inaugural releases represent the rich diversity of the Midwestern literary landscape and the hidden talent lurking there. To find out more about Switchgrass books navigate to their website or listen to this recent interview with NIU press director Alex Schwartz talking about the new imprint and it’s first two releases on Chicago Public Radio’s Eight Forty-Eight. Our warm congratulations. . . .

Read more »

Search for books and authors