Monthly Archives: January 2018

Choice Outstanding Academic Titles 2017

January 31, 2018
By

Choice, the review magazine from the ALA aimed at academic libraries, has released its annual list of Outstanding Academic Titles, and, as usual, we are proud to find the University of Chicago Press represented by a substantial number of books. Congratulations to all the authors of the books below!   CHOICE Outstanding Academic Titles, 2017 Robert C. Bartlett, Sophistry and Political Philosophy: Protagoras’ Challenge to Socrates Charles Bernstein, Pitch of Poetry David Brody, Housekeeping by Design: Hotels and Labor Alison A. Chapman, The Legal Epic: “Paradise Lost” and the Early Modern Law Chip Colwell, Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture Helen Anne Curry, Evolution Made to Order: Plant Breeding and Technological Innovation in Twentieth-Century America Joel Dinerstein, The Origins of Cool in Postwar America Niles Elderidge, Telmo Pievani, Emanuele Serreli, and Ilya Temkin, eds, Evolutionary Theory: A Hierarchical Perspective Constance M. Furey, Poetic Relations: Intimacy and Faith in the English Reformation John Hollander, The Substance of Shadow: A Darkening Trope in Poetic History Matthew L. Jones, Reckoning with Matter: Calculating Machines, Innovation, and Thinking about Thinking from Pascal to Babbage Daniel LaChance, Executing Freedom: The Cultural Life of Capital Punishment in the United . . .

Read more »

Author Interview: Benjamin I. Page and Martin Gilens

January 26, 2018
By
Author Interview: Benjamin I. Page and Martin Gilens

The last election cycle brought the process of assigning votes under the electoral college renewed scrutiny, while also highlighting the susceptibility of the American voting public to propagandistic appeals, and turning attention to the extreme amount of influence of wealthy corporations and wealthy individuals on both sides of the aisle. These, among other factors, are seen by many as increasingly dire threats to the core values of the American democratic voting system, threats that, if left unchecked, have the potential to grow exponentially in relation to the wealthy’s bank accounts in what Jared Bernstein describes, in a recent interview with political scientists Benjamin I. Page and Martin Gilens, as a kind of “self-reinforcing cycle, where wealth concentration drives political outcomes that enrich and strengthen the donor class while blocking policies that would push the other way.” But is it too late? Has our democracy reached the same tipping point as our climate? Has this feedback loop already snowballed into an unstoppable avalanche whose path cuts straight through our most sacred American democratic values? Are we already secretly but not-so-secretly living under a plutocratic system and everybody knows it but nobody says anything because they just don’t want to seem unpatriotic . . .

Read more »

Jonathan Z. Smith, historian of religion, 1938-2017

January 12, 2018
By
Jonathan Z. Smith, historian of religion, 1938-2017

Historian of religion Jonathan Z. Smith died on December 30, aged seventy-nine. He leaves a remarkable legacy from his forty-five-year career at the University of Chicago as a teacher, mentor, writer, and scholar. His colleague Margaret M. Mitchell told the University of Chicago’s Andrew Bauld that Smith was “a quintessential Chicago scholar of indomitable intellectual energy and unforgettable wit, iconoclastic in the very best sense, and utterly dedicated to a life of learning and teaching—for himself, his students and for a civil society.” Bruce Lincoln, who studied with Smith as a graduate student, recalled him as a teacher: “As a lecturer, he was absolutely spellbinding. In exchanges with students he was wonderfully encouraging, challenging and inspiring.” We are proud to have published five books by Jonathan Smith. If you want to get a sense of his voice and breadth of knowledge, you can look at an excerpt from his book Relating Religion here. The University of Chicago has a more extensive obituary appreciation on its main site. Our thoughts are with his family.   . . .

Read more »

Free eBooks from The University of Chicago Press – Building the American Republic, Volumes 1 and 2

January 10, 2018
By
Free eBooks from The University of Chicago Press – Building the American Republic, Volumes 1 and 2

Donald Trump takes the podium outside the Capitol Building to be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States–freeze frame, record scratch, cue up the intro to that one song by The Who, and a narrator chimes in: “Now I bet you’re wondering how we ended up here?” Flashback to a bunch of seasick Europeans disembarking from their ship on the eastern shores of the new world–to the surprise and perhaps amusement of some of the locals who are just out for a stroll. And so begins the first volume of our magisterial new two-volume history of the United States, Building the American Republic. Okay, that’s not really how it starts–but it totally should be if anyone ever wants to option the television rights! Right now though you can see how the books really begin yourself by downloading the e-books of both volumes at buildingtheamericanrepublic.org absolutely free. With the need for an informed electorate more clear now than ever, these books, written by two of the foremost experts on American history working in the field today, are an indispensable asset in understanding America’s past and present, and what can be done to guarantee its future. At a time when knowledge . . .

Read more »

Search for books and authors