Blog Archives

“International Burn a Koran Day” and Al Qaeda’s “recruitment bonanza”

September 9, 2010
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“International Burn a Koran Day” and  Al Qaeda’s “recruitment bonanza”

  In an interview broadcast this morning on ABC’s “Good Morning America” President Barack Obama has added his voice to a growing number of top officials denouncing Pastor Terry Jones of the Dove World Outreach Center’s planned “International Burn a Koran Day“—stating that if the group really decides to go through with the protest, it would likely result in a “recruitment bonanza for Al Qaeda.” And while Obama’s words are likely motivated by a desire to put a stop to what amounts to hate-speech, it also might absurdly suggest that Muslims would be so offended by the foolish acts of a single fringe religious group that they would be willing to rush out to kill themselves and others in droves by way of retaliation. Enter Cutting the Fuse: The Explosion of Global Suicide Terrorism and How to Stop It—an insightful look at how suicide terrorists are really created and the best strategies combat them. In the book Robert A. Pape and James K. Feldman, two of the world’s leading experts on the subject, offer a close analysis of suicide campaigns by Al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Lebanon, Israel, Chechnya, and Sri Lanka, to argue that . . .

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Ebooks on JSTOR?

September 7, 2010
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Ebooks on JSTOR?

Over the last decade or so digital content archives like JSTOR and Project MUSE have become indispensable resources in the academic community, allowing students and professors to easily sort through and access literally tens-of-thousands of journal articles with the click of a mouse. However, for those working with scholarly monographs and other book-length works, usually a trip down to the library and more than a few minutes spent digging through the stacks has been necessary. But an article in this morning’s Chronicle of Higher Education points out that this may be coming to an end. According to the CHE “Next year, Project MUSE plans to expand beyond journals into digital monographs with a venture called MUSE Editions. And JSTOR is having its own conversations with press directors about the feasibility of its building a mechanism to get scholarly e-books into library hands, as it already does with journal content.” But the word is still out on whether full-length e-books have as bright a future as journal articles on library platforms like JSTOR. The CHE article cites Kiely remarking that “eighty percent of Chicago’s e-book sales last year . . .

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CMOS 16 in the News

September 1, 2010
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CMOS 16 in the News

The reviews are in, and they’re all raves! One day after the official publication date of The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, the Chicago Tribune weighed in with a feature-length story about the new edition and the readers who love it. Steve Johnson, the Tribune‘s pop culture critic, writes: Bound, famously, in orange and thicker with each new edition, the 104-year-old reference classic has kept watch over the publication of hundreds of great books and thousands of not-so-great ones, an arbiter and aide-de-camp for editors trying to decide how to handle items in a list, punctuation within quotes or, these days, the proper hexadecimal code for the German double low-9 quotation mark (201E, as you probably suspected). The Tribune article also quotes Wendy McClure, an author and editor at Albert Whitman & Company: “I love that big, crazy, orange book.… It’s what I’ve turned to when I’m unsure about something when I’m proofreading. But also, when you have your first publishing job and are trying to figure out how this all works, you’ve got this whole big book you can plunge into.” The New York Times Paper Cuts blog chimed in with a “usage geek’s” take on what’s new . . .

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Royko on TV

September 1, 2010
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Royko on TV

Royko in Love: Mike’s Letters to Carol, the newest edition to the Press’s collection of works by the award winning journalist, offers a rare look into the personal life of one of Chicago’s most beloved public icons. Through his writing Royko made a reputation for himself as the prototypical hard-nosed Chicago journalist—tough, funny, acerbic, yet eloquent enough to win a Pulitzer Prize. But in Royko in Love we see another side, both sensitive and vulnerable and passionately consumed with wooing his childhood sweetheart, Carol Duckman. Royko in Love was collected and edited by Royko’s son, David Royko and over the next few days he will be making several TV appearances speak about the book and offer further insights into his father’s life and career. Tonight you can catch David Royko on Fox Chicago News at 9:00 pm, tomorrow on ABC 7 Chicago News at 4:00 pm, and next week on the Tuesday edition of WTTW’s Chicago Tonight and Thursday September 29 on WGN’s Midday News. We’ll also post the video online as it becomes available. See also, photos of Mike and Carol Royko, with commentary by David Royko. . . .

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September’s free e-book brings the Manual‘s past into the present

September 1, 2010
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September’s free e-book brings the Manual‘s past into the present

With the release of the 16th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style the publishing world has reached another landmark. Though its predecessor, the fifteenth edition, was released but seven short years ago, technological innovations in publishing and the proliferation of new media platforms have continued to revolutionize the field, making the release of a new edition—a guidebook to this new digital frontier, if you will—a necessity. The first edition to be published simultaneously in print and online, the new sixteenth edition in both form and substance fully engages with the future of the publishing industry. But no matter how it may exhibit our editorial staff’s enthusiasm for change and flexibility, we haven’t forgotten our roots either. And to prove it were bringing a piece of the Manual‘s past into the present with this month’s free e-book: The Manual of Style: A Facsimile of the 1906 Edition. That’s right, its an electronic version of the first ever Manual of Style—all 214 pages of it, including specimens of type, ornaments, initials, and borders! And in two colors! Check back each month for more free e-books from the University of Chicago Press or for all our currently available e-books, see our complete . . .

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The United States’s changing role in the “higher education ecosystem”

August 31, 2010
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The United States’s changing role in the “higher education ecosystem”

For much of the last century American universities have held their place as global leaders in higher education, but recently, with the United State’s economic dominance increasingly jeopardized by rising world powers such as China, and to a lesser extent India, there have been some quiet grumblings about a possible “reverse brain drain.” Numbers of US born grad students in the sciences have, of late, been on the decline, while many foreign-born students—who make up a significant portion of the domestic scientific community, and who continue arrive in droves to attend the nation’s elite research institutions—are increasingly able to find high quality employment in their home countries. And while other factors may come into play—post 9/11 restrictions on employment visas, political decisions that redirect funding for scientific research— a new book from the National Bureau of Economic Research, American Universities in a Global Market edited by Charles T. Clotfelter, offers some fascinating insights into this phenomenon, viewing the issue in terms of economics, and drawing on the knowledge of some of the world’s leading economists to help analyze it. From a recent interview with Clotfelter for Inside Higher Ed: Q. There’ve been lots of recent analyses of American higher education’s . . .

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A window into the architectural process

August 27, 2010
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A window into the architectural process

Contemporary architecture has undergone some radical transformations alongside advancements in technology that allow architects and engineers to design and construct buildings that were impossible just a few years ago. Viewing the finished works—works like Daniel Liebeskind’s Fredrick C. Hamilton building, or Frank Gehry’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts—inevitably evokes questions about their construction. How were they built, and how do some of these precariously tilted structures remain standing? In his recent book Architecture Under Construction—a collection of eighty black and white images of some of our most unusual new buildings in the process of their construction—Guggenheim Award-winning photographer Stanley Greenberg explores the complex mystery and beauty of buildings before they receive their obscuring skin. Stephen Longmire writes for a recent article in the Chicago Reader: By arriving before anyone else—except the builders, who are nowhere to be seen—Greenberg is able to study the guts of these iconic constructions. It’s a matter of political principle for the New York-based photographer, whose two previous books, Invisible New York (1998) and Waterworks (2003), explore the seldom-seen infrastructure of his home town. “During the Bush years, everything was hidden,” he told me in a recent interview. “I wanted to look beneath . . .

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“The 17 Most Innovative University Presses”

August 24, 2010
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“The 17 Most Innovative University Presses”

While most mainstream media coverage of the publishing industry devotes itself to reviews of trade titles from major commercial publishing houses, the Huffington Post has recently devoted several articles to plumbing the depths of the publishing world to bring to light some of the hidden gems independent and university publishing houses have to offer. Following up on their recent spotlight of independent literary presses, the HufPo‘s Anis Shivani has penned a new article “devoted to the most exciting university presses in the country” the best of which, Shivani writes, “combine profound scholarship with accessible language, to present books that are both of the moment and can claim a place in the canon.…” Shivani continues, “the misimpression should be removed: university presses do not publish boring or excessively weighty or arcane books. They may not be into showmanship and high-stakes publicity maneuvers, but their steady, unrelenting focus on particular subject areas creates vast bodies of new knowledge that the mainstream reviewing community makes a great mistake in ignoring.” Case in point, check out some of our most recent general interest offerings on our website. From Roger Ebert’s The Great Movies III to Robert K. Elder’s Last Words of the Executed to . . .

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The Bible of the Publishing Industry and its #1 Evangelist

August 23, 2010
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The Bible of the Publishing Industry and its #1 Evangelist

Anita Samen, one of the many brilliant minds behind the new sixteenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style—and as managing editor at the press, also one of its foremost devotees, evangelists, and hermeneutists—made an appearance on WTTW’s Chicago Tonight last Thursday to discuss the new 16th edition and the updated CMOS online website. Check out the archived video below: See more about the book or check out some of the various subscription options for the Chicago Manual of Style Online. Or, get started by sampling some of the free content offered on the site including the Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide and the ever popular Q&A. . . .

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CMOS 16 Goes Digital

August 20, 2010
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CMOS 16 Goes Digital

And we’re live! The evening of August 17, Press IT staff flipped the so-called switch, and The Chicago Manual of Style Online, 16th Edition, was successfully launched to much fanfare from editors, writers, and style mavens alike. As the very first edition to be published simultaneously in print and online, this revision begins a fresh chapter in the hundred-year history of the venerable Manual. Much has changed since the last edition came out in 2003, and the sixteenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style has been reorganized to reflect the way publishing professionals work in the digital age. Replete with the clear, well-considered advice on style and usage that devotees of The Chicago Manual of Style have come to expect, the sixteenth edition also provides a wealth of new information and guidelines for electronic workflow and processes. After the launch, The Chicago Manual of Style Online subscribers automatically received the sixteenth-edition content update, while retaining their access to the fifteenth-edition content. Garrett Kiely, director of the Press, explains why. “We took this unusual step of keeping the previous edition available in our online product because of the way editors and authors work. Many will be involved in projects that . . .

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