Author Events

Upcoming events for Outside the Box

April 4, 2014
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Upcoming events for Outside the Box

Hillary L. Chute spent a significant portion of the past decade studying, hanging out with, and interviewing many of the artists whose iconic images have helped define contemporary graphic arts. In Outside the Box: Interviews with Contemporary Cartoonists, Chute collects these interviews in book form for the first time, delivering in-depth discussions with twelve of the most prominent and accomplished artists and writers in comics today, and revealing a creative community that is richly interconnected yet fiercely independent. The interviewees include Lynda Barry and Alison Bechdel, Charles Burns and Joe Sacco, and even a never-before published conversation between Art Spiegelman and Chris Ware.

In addition to unparalleled access into the cartooning world, Outside the Box also puts narrative power into the hands of this cast of masters—without whom our eyes (and ears) would not take in such gripping stories.

For Chicagoans, Chute will talk about the book and her experiences as documentarian and scholar of the cartooning community at two upcoming events:

A discussion at the Seminary Co-op Bookstore, 5751 S. Woodlawn, Thursday, April 10th, 6 PM

A talk and signing at Quimby’s, 1854 W. North Ave., Saturday, April 19th, 7 . . .

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College Art Association (2014)

February 20, 2014
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College Art Association (2014)

Some images from behind the scenes by sleuth photographer and marketing director Carol Kasper:

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Neil Verma and War of the Worlds

October 21, 2013
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Neil Verma and War of the Worlds

Neil Verma’s work examines idiosyncratic and affective spaces in media history, often those whose eccentricity hinges on particularly interdisciplinary cultural turns. In Theater of the Mind: Imagination, Aesthetics, and American Radio Drama, Verma engages with an archive of over six-thousand radio play recordings—including those penned by Norman Corwin, Wyllis Cooper, and Lucille Fletcher—in order to build a case for the radio drama as one of the most defining forms of mid-twentieth-century genre fiction.

Most recently, Verma has been curating a series of web-based essays on the radio plays of Orson Welles at the Sound Studies blog, which will run until January 2014.

October 30, 2013, marks the seventy-fifth anniversary of “The War of the Worlds,” initially aired by Welles as an episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air. To commemorate this, Verma will deliver a lecture and slideshow at the Music Box’s 35mm screening of Byron Haskin’s film War of the Worlds (1953) on October 27th and again at an airing of Welles’s original broadcast at Doc Films on October 29th.

On top of this, Verma will helm a nationwide (!) stream and response via social media (hashtag: #WOTW75) to the original recording, . . .

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Light Reading

November 5, 2010
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Light Reading

This weekend marks the fifth annual NY Art Book Fair (though things technically got underway last night) at MOMA’s PS1 in Long Island City, Queens. Sponsored by Printed Matter, the non-profit institution dedicated to the promotion of artists’ books and material ephemera, the Fair features cutting-edge art organizations, journals, scholars (Boris Groys), and contemporary artists (Paul Chan and Kristin Lucas, among them), alongside over 200 exhibitors, including native Chicagoans Soberscove Press and Temporary Services. In celebration of the conference, we’d like to point you toward some events and exhibitions organized around the work of one of our own purveyors of that soon-to-be discussed art-book hybrid, Press author Josiah McElheny.

McElheny’s The Light Club: On Paul Scheerbart’s “The Light Club of Batavia” has already enjoyed a profile in ARTnews, a centenary party cohosted by Cabinet, and mention in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

A recent editor’s choice review in BOMB engages the book in sum:

The slim volume The Light Club reveals McElheny’s passion for modernity’s early days, its promises, its failures, and its forgotten stories. The book offers the first English translation of Der Lichtklub von Batavia, a futuristic satire from 1912 by German novelist and theorist Paul Scheerbart, . . .

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Celebrate the 2010 Printer’s Row Lit Fest with the University of Chicago Press

June 9, 2010
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Celebrate the 2010 Printer’s Row Lit Fest with the University of Chicago Press

Looking to indulge your literary side this weekend? Join the University of Chicago Press at the 2010 Printer’s Row Lit Fest this Saturday and Sunday, June 12-13. Not only will the Press be on site selling our fabulous wares, plenty of Press authors will be on hand reading from and discussing their books. Here’s a lowdown of what’s happening at the Fest.

All weekend long, the Press will be selling our books at our booth (located in Tent O, which will be closer to Polk than Harrison. This is a new location for us, as our usual spot will be occupied by construction equipment. Use this map to find us). We’ll have our newest releases, as well as many of our most popular Chicago titles and stunning picture books (all of which make great gifts for Dad!). We’ll also be bringing back our popular $5 table: everything on it will cost you just one portrait of Abraham Lincoln. Among the books you’ll find on the discount table will be Roger Ebert’s Awake in the Dark: The Best of Roger Ebert, Normal Maclean’s Young Men and Fire, and Mike Royko’s One More Time: The Best of Mike Royko. Supplies of these . . .

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An exhibition of images from Architecture under Construction at the AIC

June 8, 2010
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An exhibition of images from Architecture under Construction at the AIC

Photographer Stanley Greenberg, whose new book Architecture under Construction offers a fascinating collection of images of some of our most unusual new buildings in the process of being built, is currently exhibiting part of the collection featured in the book in the Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing, Kurokawa Gallery. From a press release on the AIC’s website:

While avant-garde architecture has frequently inspired today’s art photographers and video artists, Stanley Greenberg is the first to focus a documentary-style lens on the subject. Greenberg’s luminous large-scale black-and-white photographs explore avant-garde structures in the process of being built. Using highly cropped views, Greenberg captures moments in the assembly of architecture that are rarely evident in the final building, revealing the complexity of contemporary construction and the residual visual unfolding of spaces resulting from these feats of structural gymnastics.

Find out more about the exhibit, or, if a trip to downtown Chicago isn’t on your agenda before the close in September, check out our gallery of photographs from the book.

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Dreaming of future books

April 20, 2010
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Dreaming of future books

Andrew Piper’s Dreaming in Books: The Making of the Bibliographic Imagination in the Romantic Age explores literary culture at the turn of the nineteenth century to show how, alongside the period’s innovations in mass printing, romantic writing and writers themselves played crucial roles in creating the age’s “bookish culture.”

And in keeping with the theme of his book, Piper will appear at the Blue Metropolis Montreal International Literary Festival on Saturday, April 24, at 1 p.m to participate in a panel discussion titled: “Reading the World: The Future of the Book” as part of the five-day long festivities, which begin Wednesday. An article on the festival in the Saturday edition of the Montreal Gazette cites Piper on the “bookish culture” of today:

When McGill professor Andrew Piper was a child, punishment meant being sent to his room to read.

Today, if the father of two metes out punishment to either his 5-year-old son or 3-year-old daughter, it means taking away a bedtime story, be it Scaredy Squirrel’s latest adventure or a Frog and Toad tale.

Piper grew into his love of books and became an expert on the relationship between the book and literature in the 18th and 19th . . .

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A Humboldtian Renaissance

March 30, 2010
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A Humboldtian Renaissance

Humboldt who? That’s usually the reaction from modern readers when introduced to the father of geography, Alexander von Humboldt. He was admired by Darwin and Jefferson, yet Humboldt is less well-known than the men he inspired. So why is it important to keep his legacy alive? And what does this nineteenth-century German-born naturalist have to offer science and the humanities in the twenty-first century anyway? A lot. At least that’s what the University of Chicago Press thinks, and we’ve begun publishing books that translate his writing and contextualize his explorations.

Last year, the Press published The Passage to Cosmos: Alexander von Humboldt and the Shaping of America, Laura Dassow Walls’s reintroduction of this seminal thinker to new audiences. Her book traces Humboldt’s ideas for Cosmos —the book that crowned his career—to his 1799 journey to the Americas, where he first experienced the diversity of nature and of the world’s peoples—and envisioned a new cosmopolitanism that would link ideas, disciplines, and nations into a global web of knowledge and cultures. Walls recently spoke about Humboldt and her book at the Virginia Festival of the Book, and Book TV was there to film the presentation. After you watch her speech here, . . .

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The Emergence of the Modern Surveillance State

February 11, 2010
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The Emergence of the Modern Surveillance State

During the Progressive Era, social activists in New York employed private investigators to seek out behavior they viewed as sexually promiscuous, politically undesirable, or downright criminal. The goal was to uncover the roots of society’s problems, and the information collected eventually empowered government regulators in the Progressive era and beyond, strengthening a federal state that grew increasingly repressive in the interest of pursuing a national security agenda.

Jennifer Fronc’s history of this urban movement, New York Undercover: Private Surveillance in the Progressive Era, follows these investigators—often journalists or social workers with no training in surveillance—on their information-gathering visits to gambling parlors, brothels, and meetings of criminal gangs and radical political organizations. Drawing on the hundreds of detailed reports that resulted from these missions, Fronc reconstructs the process by which organizations like the National Civic Federation and the Committee of Fourteen generated the knowledge they needed to change urban conditions. Revealing the central role of undercover investigation in both social change and the constitution of political authority, New York Undercover narrates previously untold chapters in the history of vice and the emergence of the modern surveillance state.

Fronc recently discussed her book as part of a series at New York . . .

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“Picturing the Studio,” Dec. 11—Feb. 13 at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

December 8, 2009
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“Picturing the Studio,” Dec. 11—Feb. 13 at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Beginning with a reception this Friday, December 11th at 4:30 pm at the Art Institute of Chicago’s Sullivan Galleries and running through February 13, 2010, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago presents “Picturing the Studio“—an exhibition exploring “the richly complex politically- and psychologicaly-charged notion of the artist’s studio today… with works by over 30 artists spanning the past two decades… including several specially designed installations undertaken by artists on site.” Curated by Michelle Grabner, (SAIC), and Annika Marie, (Columbia College), featured artists include: Jan Bas Ader, Conrad Bakker, John Baldessari, Stephanie Brooks, Ivan Brunetti, Ann Craven, Julian Dashper, Dana DeGuilio, Susanne Doremus, Joe Fig, Dan Fischer, Julia Fish, Nicholas Frank, Alicia Frankovich, Judith Geichman, Rodney Graham, Karl Haendel, Shane Huffman, Barbara Kasten, Matt Keegan, Daniel Lavitt, Daniel; Adelheid Mers, Tom Moody, Bruce Nauman, Paul Nudd, Leland Rice, David Robbins, Kay Rosen, Amanda Ross-Ho, Carrie Schneider, Roman Signer, Amy Sillman, Frances Stark, Nicholas Steindorf, and James Welling.

In conjunction with the School of the Art Institute the University of Chicago press is also pleased to announce the forthcoming companion volume to the exhibition, The Studio Reader: On the Space of Artists edited by Mary Jane Jacob and Michelle . . .

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