Author Events

John A. Nagl at the Pritzker Military Library

July 12, 2007
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John A. Nagl at the Pritzker Military Library

Lieutenant Colonel John A. Nagl, author of Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam, will speak this coming Saturday, July 14, at 10:00 am at the Pritzker Military Library in downtown Chicago. According to the library’s website “Nagl, recently returned from Iraq and now commanding a battalion, will share his observations, experiences and thoughts while discussing the recently updated Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife.” (You can read Nagl’s new preface to the book online.) See the Library’s website for more details about the event. Invariably, armies are accused of preparing to fight the previous war. In Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Nagl—a veteran of both Operation Desert Storm and the current conflict in Iraq—considers the now-crucial question of how armies adapt to changing circumstances during the course of conflicts for which they are initially unprepared. Through the use of archival sources and interviews with participants in both engagements, Nagl compares the development of counterinsurgency doctrine and practice in the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960 with what developed in the Vietnam War from 1950 to 1975. Nagl also contributed a foreword to our edition of the . . .

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Paul D’Amato at the Stephen Daiter Gallery

July 9, 2007
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Paul D’Amato at the Stephen Daiter Gallery

Photographs by Paul D’Amato are currently on exhibit at the Stephen Daiter Gallery. The show includes some of the work that we published in Barrio: Photographs from Chicago’s Pilsen and Little Village, as well as photographs from a more recent project on Lake Street. In Barrio, D’Amato made the narratives of daily life in Pilsen and Little Village manifest in photographs of children at play, teenagers out in the night, graffiti, families in their homes, gangs in the alleys, weddings, and more. His photos are beautifully composed and startling—visual narratives that are surreal and dreamlike, haunting and mythic. The Stephen Daiter Gallery is at 311 West Superior Street in Chicago. The showing continues through July 28. Also, visit Paul D’Amato’s website. . . .

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Printers Row Book Fair this Weekend

June 6, 2007
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Printers Row Book Fair this Weekend

The annual Printers Row Book Fair is this weekend, June 9-10, in the historic Printers Row district in Chicago’s south loop. Along with more than a hundred publishers and bookstores plying their wares, the fair offers the opportunity to meet firsthand the literary masterminds behind some wonderful UCP books, including readings and author signings from: Joel Greenberg, author of A Natural History of the Chicago Region and Sally A. Kitt Chappell author of Chicago’s Urban Nature: A Guide to the City’s Architecture + Landscape. June 9, 3:00 pm at Grace Place, Sanctuary, second floor. Carl Smith author of The Plan of Chicago: Daniel Burnham and the Remaking of the American City. June 10, 1:00 pm at the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry stage. Mary Pattillo, author of Black on the Block: The Politics of Race and Class in the City. June 10, 1:30 pm at University Center / Private Dining Room. Paul D’Amato author of Barrio: Photographs from Chicago’s Pilsen and Little Village. June 10, 3:30 pm at University Center / Private Dining Room. The University of Chicago Press will be located in Tent A at Congress and Dearborn and will be offering books from the above authors and many more. Check . . .

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Mary Patillo on Eight Forty-Eight

May 17, 2007
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Mary Patillo on Eight Forty-Eight

Author Mary Pattillo was featured Tuesday on Chicago Public Radio’s daily news-radio talk show Eight Forty-Eight. Pattillo speaks with host Richard Steele about her new book Black on the Block: The Politics of Race and Class in the City and the revitalization of Chicago’s North Kenwood-Oakland neighborhood. Their conversation explores the problems facing this rapidly gentrifying black community to touch on broader issues of race and class in contemporary urban America. You can find archived audio of the show on the Chicago Public Radio website. Pattillo will also be at 57th Street Books today at 7pm to read from her book. In the meantime, you can check out an excerpt on our website. . . .

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Susan Bielstein on WVKR’s Library Cafe

March 22, 2007
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Susan Bielstein on WVKR’s Library Cafe

Susan Bielstein, author of Permissions, A Survival Guide: Blunt Talk about Art as Intellectual Property will appear on Library Café, a program on WVKR Independent Radio FM 91.3 in Poughkeepsie, NY, on March 27th at 11 am CST. Bielstein will join host Thomas Hill to discuss her book. You can tune in to a live broadcast online at the Library Café where they should also post archived audio after the show. Organized as a series of “takes” that range from short sidebars to extended discussions, Permissions, A Survival Guide explores intellectual property law as it pertains to visual imagery. How can you determine whether an artwork is copyrighted? How do you procure a high-quality reproduction of an image? What does “fair use” really mean? Is it ever legitimate to use the work of an artist without permission? Bielstein discusses the many uncertainties that plague writers who work with images in this highly visual age, and she does so based on her years navigating precisely these issues. As an editor who has hired a photographer to shoot an incredibly obscure work in the Italian mountains (a plan that backfired hilariously), who has tried to reason with artists’ estates in languages she . . .

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James Attlee at the Oxford Literary Festival

March 21, 2007
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James Attlee at the Oxford Literary Festival

Author James Attlee was interviewed by Danny Cox of BBC Radio Oxford on the occasion of the 2007 Sunday Times Oxford Literary Festival. Attlee discussed his book Isolarion: A Different Oxford Journey. You can listen to archived audio (RealMedia format) of the interview. In Isolarion Attlee delivers a thoughtful, streetwise, and personal account of his pilgrimage to a place he thought he already knew—the Cowley Road in Oxford, right outside his door. Though a lesser known local on Oxford’s lower east side, Attlee reveals Cowley to be a thoroughly modern, impressively cosmopolitan, and utterly organic collection of shops, restaurants, pubs, and religious establishments teeming with life and reflecting the multicultural makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. In his interview Attlee expands on that notion by focusing on his account of the Cowley Road as a story not only about this quaint Oxford neighborhood, but a more universal tale of modern cities generally. We have an excerpt from the book. . . .

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Phillip Gossett on 98.7 WFMT

January 8, 2007
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Phillip Gossett on 98.7 WFMT

Tonight—Monday, January 8—at 10 p.m. 98.7 WFMT Radio’s Critical Thinking with Andrew Patner will present the first of two programs with University of Chicago musicologist Philip Gossett discussing his new book Divas and Scholars: Performing Italian Opera, illustrating his points on bel canto opera performance with musical extracts. The second program will air Monday, January 15, at 10 p.m. Divas and Scholars is a dazzling and beguiling account of how opera comes to the stage, filled with Philip Gossett’s personal experiences of triumphant—and even failed—performances and suffused with his towering and tonic passion for music. Writing as a fan, a musician, and a scholar, Gossett, the world’s leading authority on the performance of Italian opera, brings colorfully to life the problems, and occasionally the scandals, that attend the production of some of our most favorite operas. Read an excerpt. . . .

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Podcast: Against Prediction

December 7, 2006
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Podcast: Against Prediction

Bernard Harcourt, author of the recent Against Prediction: Profiling, Policing, and Punishing in an Actuarial Age, gave a talk last month for the Chicago’s Best Ideas series at the University of Chicago Law School exploring and expanding on the topics he discusses in his new book. According to the Law School’s Faculty Blog, “the talk was a very interesting look at law enforcement profiling and whether it works. Professor Harcourt approached this empirically, discussing whether it works on a practical level, injecting a new element in a debate that is traditionally about morals and ethics.” You can listen to the podcast of Harcourt’s talk and follow along with the slides from his PowerPoint presentation. You can find his book on our website. Either way it would be ill advised to overlook his timely and revealing critique of the methods underlying our modern law enforcement policy. Update: Chicago Public Radio’s 848 also recently interviewed Harcourt about his new book. The audio can be found on the 848 website. Enjoy! . . .

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Sereni or Bernstein?

November 29, 2006
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Sereni or Bernstein?

Chicago poetry lovers will have a difficult choice to make tomorrow: Bernstein or Sereni? The work of both poets will be featured in events the evening of Thursday, November 30. Language poet Charles Bernstein, author of over 30 books, including Girly Man, My Way, and With Strings is one of the most important figures working in the genre. He will be at the University of Chicago for a reading at 5:30 pm Thursday night in Rosenwald Hall, room 405, 1101 E. 58th Street. He will lecture on Friday at 1:00 pm in Classics, room 110. In preparation you can check out some Bernstein writings, including "Report from Liberty Street" and "Against National Poetry Month as Such". Meanwhile downtown, Peter Robinson will present his English translations of the works of Italian poet Vittorio Sereni—one of the most important avant-garde Italian poets of the twentieth century—collected in the volume The Selected Poetry and Prose of Vittorio Sereni: A Bilingual Edition. The event will take place at 6:00 pm at the Italian Cultural Institute, 500 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1450. Choose your poetics, choose a poet, you must choose. . . .

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The geeky legacy of the Whole Earth Catalog

November 1, 2006
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The geeky legacy of the Whole Earth Catalog

We have previously noted the fond regard that geeks hold for the Whole Earth Catalog. Two more testimonials have burbled up through the ether. Tim O’Reilly, publisher of all those techie books with animals on their covers, says on his blog, O’Reilly Radar: We shamelessly copied the name of the Whole Earth Catalog for our groundbreaking Whole Internet User’s Guide and Catalog, but that’s the least of our debts to Stewart and crew. A huge amount of the O’Reilly sensibility, a mix of practicality and idealism, was learned from the Whole Earth Catalog. Cory Doctorow also notes his affection and the influence of WEC, writing on BoingBoing: Count me among those who were heavily influenced by the Catalogs. I have a complete set in a storage locker in Toronto. I used to pore through them for hours on rainy days, marvelling at the flowering of the mission of “access to tools and ideas.” The comments of O’Reilly and Doctorow are occasioned by the announcement of the Stanford University Libraries’ upcoming symposium From Counterculture to Cyberculture: The Legacy of the Whole Earth Catalog. Taking its title from Fred Turner’s recent book, the symposium will explore the the “extraordinary impact of . . .

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