Awards

William H. McNeill awarded a National Humanities Medal

February 26, 2010
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William H. McNeill awarded a National Humanities Medal

In a ceremony that took place yesterday in the East Room of the White House President Barack Obama awarded University of Chicago historian and author William H. McNeill a National Humanities Medal. According to the NEH press release McNeill was awarded the prize in recognition of “his exceptional talent as a teacher and scholar… and as an author of more than twenty books, including The Rise of the West, which traces civilizations through 5,000 years of recorded history.” An article in today’s Washington Post notes that alongside McNeill, a rather eclectic assortment of prominent figures in the arts, including singer Bob Dylan, actor and director Clint Eastwood, painter Frank Stella, and Nobel laureate and author Elie Wiesel, also received awards. The article in the Post continues: Leaders in the arts and humanities are surveyed by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, both federally funded agencies, and the final list is selected by the White House. “These individuals and organizations show us how many ways art works every day,” NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman said in a statement. “They represent the breadth and depth of American architecture, design, film, music, performance, theater and visual art.” . . .

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University of Chicago Press wins 11 PROSE awards

February 8, 2010
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University of Chicago Press wins 11 PROSE awards

We are pleased to announce that the University of Chicago Press was the recipient of eleven PROSE awards at this year’s Association of American Publishers/Professional and Scholarly Publishing conference in Washington, D.C., including their top prize, the R.R. Hawkins Award, for Catherine H. Zuckert’s 2009 Plato’s Philosophers: The Coherence of the Dialogues. The PROSE awards are the American Publisher Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence. According to the award website “the PROSE Awards annually recognize the very best in professional and scholarly publishing by bringing attention to distinguished books, journals, and electronic content in over 40 categories. Judged by peer publishers, librarians, and medical professionals since 1976, the PROSE Awards are extraordinary for their breadth and depth.” In addition to the R.R. Hawkins Award Zuckert’s Plato’s Philosphers also received the top Award for Excellence in Humanities and the top award in the philosophy category. Other winners include: Michael Camille’s The Gargoyles of Notre-Dame: Medievalism and the Monsters of Modernity— top prize in the Art & Art History. Michael Forsberg’s Great Plains: America’s Lingering Wild—top award in the Biological & Life Sciences category. Cathy Gere’s Knossos and the Prophets of Modernism—top award in the Archeology & Anthropology category. Lance Grande and . . .

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Randall Couch recieves Corneliu M Popescu Prize for Poetry Translation

January 14, 2010
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Randall Couch recieves Corneliu M Popescu Prize for Poetry Translation

Last November we were pleased to note that Randall Couch was the recipient of Corneliu M Popescu Prize for Poetry Translation for his translation from the Spanish of Mad Women by Chilean Gabriela Mistral. The award—named after the translator of the work of one of Romania’s leading poets—highlights the important, but unfortunately relatively scarce, contributions of literature in translation to the English speaking world. The award was announced by judges Elaine Feinstein and Stephen Romer on Thursday, 19 November 2009 in an event at London’s Romanian cultural center, the Ratiu Foundation, which has recently posted some photographs of the event on their website. For more on the award navigate to http://www.romanianculturalcentre.org.uk/. About Madwomen: A schoolteacher whose poetry catapulted her to early fame in her native Chile and an international diplomat whose boundary-defying sexuality still challenges scholars, Gabriela Mistral is one of the most important and enigmatic figures in Latin American literature of the last century. The Locas mujeres poems collected here are among Mistral’s most complex and compelling, exploring facets of the self in extremis—poems marked by the wound of blazing catastrophe and its aftermath of mourning. From disquieting humor to balladlike lyricism to folkloric wisdom, these pieces enact a . . .

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What is Contemporary Art? wins the Mather Award

December 31, 2009
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What is Contemporary Art? wins the Mather Award

We are pleased to announce that Terry Smith, author of What Is Contemporary Art? has won the 2010 Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism. The award, given each year by the College Art Association, is considered one of the most important in art criticism and will be presented to Smith on the evening of Wednesday, February 10 at the CAA’s annual conference in Chicago. Terry Smith is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Contemporary Art History and Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. His many books include The Architecture of Aftermath, also published by the University of Chicago Press. Navigate to the CAA website for more information about the CAA awards and to view the complete list of previous Frank Jewett Mather Award winners. . . .

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Elyn Saks Wins 2009 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship

September 22, 2009
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Elyn Saks Wins 2009 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship

Earlier this morning the Chicago based MacArthur Foundation released a list of its 2009 fellowship recipients including author and legal scholar Elyn Saks. Saks is best known for her work in mental health policy advocacy, addressing legal issues related to those suffering from severe mental illness including involuntary commitment, competency to be executed, proxy consent, and the right to refuse treatment. She has published many books on these issues including Refusing Care: Forced Treatment and the Rights of the Mentally Ill—an insightful exploration of when, if ever, the mentally ill should be treated against their will—and, more recently, a memoir of her own battle with schizophrenia in The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness. The MacArthur Fellowships, also known as “genius grants,” provide each recipient with $500,000 over five years to facilitate subsequent creative work. We are proud to have supported Saks in her past endeavors and look forward to her future contributions to the field of mental health advocacy as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow. And as we congratulate her, we add her name to the growing list of Press authors who have received a MacArthur fellowship, including 2008 fellowship recipient and author of Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine: . . .

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The Press would like to thank the Academy

May 7, 2009
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The Press would like to thank the Academy

On April 20, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences announced its new class of fellows and foreign honorary members. Among the 231 newest members of one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies are some very famous folks, including Dustin Hoffman, James Earl Jones, Dame Judi Dench, Bono, Colin Powell, and Emmylou Harris. But these marquee names are nothing compared to the real celebs on the list: the University of Chicago Press author brigade! Congratulations to Andrew Abbott, Danielle Allen, Alice Kaplan, T. J. Jackson Lears, Steven Shapin, Mary Ann Caws, Robert von Hallberg, Ruth Bernard Yeazell, and honorary member Simon Goldhill. In other academy news, the Academy of Arts and Letters announced its annual awards on April 14. Among the many deserving honorees are a handful of University of Chicago Press authors. Phoenix Poets Michael Collier and Susan Stewart were awarded an Academy Award in Literature, given to encourage creative work. Sharon Cameron won a Harold D. Vursell Memorial Award in Literature in recognition of the quality of the prose in her recent book Impersonality: Seven Essays. And poet Peter Campion was awarded the Rome Fellowship in Literature, given to young writers of exceptional promise for a year’s . . .

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Bernard Harcourt wins the Laing Prize

April 16, 2009
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Bernard Harcourt wins the Laing Prize

Since 1963, the Press has awarded the annual Gordon J. Laing Prize to the Chicago faculty author, editor, or translator whose book has brought the greatest distinction to the Press’s list. This year, at a ceremony held earlier this month, the prize honored Bernard Harcourt, the Julius Kreeger Professor of Law and Professor in Political Science, for his book Against Prediction: Profiling, Policing and Punishing in the Actuarial Age. Harcourt’s book challenges the growing use of actuarial methods—from random security checks at airports to the use of risk assessment in sentencing—to determine whom law enforcement officials target and punish. The widely perceived success of these methods, he argues, has begun to distort our very conception of just punishment and to obscure alternate visions of social order. You can listen to Harcourt discuss his arguments in greater detail during this podcast of a talk he gave for the Chicago’s Best Ideas series at the University of Chicago Law School. As the new Chicago Chronicle notes today, Harcourt said of the prize itself that it was “extremely rewarding—and also very humbling—to receive this recognition from the community of scholars who I admire the most. A community that values ideas so intensely and . . .

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U of C film theorist to receive $1.5 million Mellon grant

March 23, 2009
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U of C film theorist to receive $1.5 million Mellon grant

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Lambda finalists announced

March 17, 2009
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Lambda finalists announced

The Lambda Literary Foundation has just announced the finalists for its annual Lambda Literary Awards—and we’re pleased note that two Chicago books are in the running for best book in LGBT studies. One contender, Amin Ghaziani’s The Dividends of Dissent, chronicles the late twentieth century’s four major gay and lesbian marches on Washington—demonstrations, he argues, that helped define what it means to be gay in the United States. The other, Regina Kunzel’s Criminal Intimacy, investigates a less public realm of American life. By exploring the sexual lives of prisoners and the sexual culture of prisons over the past two centuries—along with the impact of a range of issues, including race, class, and gender; sexual violence; prisoners’ rights activism; and the HIV epidemic—Kunzel discovers a world whose surprising plurality and mutability reveals the fissures and fault lines beneath modern sexuality itself. Congratulations to both authors, who continue the nomination streak Mark Padilla’s Caribbean Pleasure Industry started last year. . . .

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Seth Lerer wins the NBCC

March 12, 2009
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Seth Lerer wins the NBCC

We have a winner. The National Book Critics Circle announced the winners of their 2008 awards today and we are happy to congratulate Seth Lerer on his win in the criticism category for Children’s Literature: A Reader’s History from Aesop to Harry Potter. A few days ago NBCC board member Carlin Romano described, in a posting to Critical Mass, the achievements of the book and the fairy-tale-like spell it cast on the committee: Lerer brought to his subject both the critical acuity and unlimited openness it deserved. He insisted on placing a complex literature within the history of childhood, a story both contested and blessedly clear. He took into account the cavalcade of publishing history, without permitting it to trample the imaginative “transformations” wrought by the books. He understood that his terrain included not just books written for children, but books read by them, driving home the critical spine signaled by his subtitle. Lerer accomplished much else in his fairy-tale feat of levitating a University of Chicago Press study, despite its small type, to a possible national prize from critics beleaguered by eye strain.… Members of the NBCC Board swallowed whole this splendid meditation on the literature that changes us . . .

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