Art and Architecture

Press release: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

July 16, 2006
By
Press release: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

In the extraordinary spirit of vision and ambition that characterized the Columbian Exposition of 1893, where new and exciting innovations in art, architecture, and urban design were so dramatically unveiled on a world stage, Millennium Park opened in downtown Chicago two years ago. Featuring now iconic works by Frank Gehry, Anish Kapoor, Jaume Plensa, and Kathryn Gustafson, the park was promptly hailed in newspapers and magazines across the country as an incomparable global tourist destination and a crowning achievement for the city of Chicago. With more than 500 images (and most in color), this beautifully illustrated book tells the story of how Millennium Park came to be.

Read the press release. You may also take our trivia quiz.

. . .

Read more »

Happy Birthday, Rembrandt!

July 15, 2006
By
Happy Birthday, Rembrandt!

Today is the 400th birthday of Rembrandt van Rijn. The master of light was born July 15, 1606, in Leiden. When he was twenty-five he moved to Amsterdam, where he lived the remainder of his sixty-three years.

A book by Steven Nadler, Rembrandt’s Jews, examines the artist’s life and work in the Jewish Quarter of Amsterdam and the depiction of Jews in his art. You can read an excerpt from Nadler’s book.

Rembrandt’s Late Religious Portraits by Arthur K. Wheelock looks at Rembrandt’s brooding half-length portraits of religious figures from the late 1650s and early 1660s. We published the book last year in conjunction with an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art.

From our deeper backlist comes Rembrandt’s Enterprise: The Studio and the Market by Svetlana Alpers, who examined Rembrandt’s appeal to the buyers of his art and his market strategies.

Many more books about Rembrandt are available from publishers we distribute.

Museums around the world have special events and exhibits marking the quadricentennial. Find an exhibition of Rembrandt’s work near you.

. . .

Read more »

Gridlock, schmidlock

July 10, 2006
By
Gridlock, schmidlock

Sunday’s issue of the Los Angeles Times featured an opinion piece by Robert Bruegmann. “Sprawl is not the worst thing that ever happened to the nation’s cities. In fact, by many measures, it’s been beneficial,” writes Bruegmann.

But isn’t sprawl to blame for gridlock on the LA freeways? No, says Bruegmann, the problem is a lagging infrastucture: “Population and density have increased without a corresponding development in the highway network. The L.A. region, once at the forefront of freeway development, now falls toward the bottom of the list of cities in the number of freeway lane miles per capita.” The divisive debate over sprawl has “weaken the consensus for funding for all kinds of transportation—public and private, highway and rail.” LA needs to “put aside for a while the old and not-terribly-helpful battles over sprawl.”

See also our excerpt from the book.

. . .

Read more »

Press release: Kruse, The New Suburban History

July 6, 2006
By
Press release: Kruse, The New Suburban History

The ten essays in The New Suburban History are all written by historians on the cutting edge of an expanding field, and draw on original research on locales across the country, from California to Michigan to North Carolina. Paying special attention to the little-known histories of blue-collar, African American, Latino, and Asian suburbanites, the authors shed light on the role suburbs have played in the transformation of liberalism and conservatism; in the contentious politics of race, class, and ethnicity; and in debates about the environment, land use, taxation, and regulation. Read the press release.

. . .

Read more »

Gilfoyle is Chicago Reader‘s Critic’s Choice

June 21, 2006
By
Gilfoyle is Chicago Reader‘s Critic’s Choice

Tonight at 6:00 p.m., Gilfoyle will discuss and sign Millennium Park at the Harold Washington Library. Items from the official archives of Millennium Park will be on view during the event. The event is free and open to the public.

Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s reading was chosen by the Chicago Reader as its Critic’s Choice of the week. Harold Henderson wrote, "The story of Millennium Park, as told by Loyola historian Timothy J. Gilfoyle in Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark, is three uplifting tales in one: the site, up from the lake and the post-Fire rubble; the politics, up from a landfill’s worth of failed plans; and the culture, up from a conservative vision of merely filling out the north end of Grant Park to a tightly packed series of walkways, sculptures, and theatrical spaces.… This impressively organized and lavishly illustrated book itself wouldn’t exist without financial support from the Minow Family Foundation. Those uncomfortable with the project’s delays, cost overruns, privatized process, or jangly outcome get their say, but the mayor has the last word."

. . .

Read more »

Author events: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

June 14, 2006
By
Author events: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

Tonight, Timothy J. Gilfoyle, author of Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark, will appear on WTTW’s "Chicago Tonight" television program. The show airs at 7:00 p.m. (CST).

Tomorrow morning, Gilfoyle will be interviewed by Gretchen Helfrich on WBEZ 91.5 FM radio’s "Eight Forty-Eight" program (9:00-10:00 a.m.). In addition to regular broadcast, the show will be accessible via an online audio stream on the WBEZ Web site.

Next Wednesday, June 21 at 6:00 p.m., Gilfoyle will speak at the Harold Washington Library’s Cindy Pritzker Auditorium (400 South State Street). Gilfoyle will discuss and sign Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark. Items from the official archives of Millennium Park will be on view during the event.

. . .

Read more »

Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

June 12, 2006
By
Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

Sunday’s edition of the Chicago Sun-Times featured a nice review of Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark. Kevin Nance wrote, "The creation of the $475 million park, which opened in July 2004 four years late and at more than twice its originally projected cost, was fraught with tension among its high-powered participants.… This high-stakes game of push-and-pull forms the dramatic core of historian Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s absorbing and lavishly illustrated Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark, to be published this week."

. . .

Read more »

Review: Bruegmann, Sprawl

June 12, 2006
By
Review: Bruegmann, Sprawl

Chicago Life recently reviewed Robert Bruegmann’s Sprawl: A Compact History: "At a recent panel discussion at the prestigious Chicago Architecture Foundation, the distinguished Doug Kelbaugh, dean of the University of Michigan’s School of Architecture, described the book Sprawl: A Compact History as the most dangerous book he as read. The book was written by the also very distinguished Robert Bruegmann, professor of architecture at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The word ‘dangerous’ suggests that something is very wrong with this book. In fact, the book, which is short and easily consumed, turns conventional wisom on its head suggesting that ‘low-density scattered, urban development without systematic large-scale or regional public land-use planning,’ in other words sprawl, is not all that bad."

The first major book to strip urban sprawl of its pejorative connotations, Sprawl offers a completely new vision of the city and its growth. Bruegmann leads readers to the powerful conclusion that "in its immense complexity and constant change, the city—whether dense and concentrated at its core, looser and more sprawling in suburbia, or in the vast tracts of exurban penumbra that extend dozens, even hundreds, of miles—is the grandest and most marvelous work of mankind."

Read an excerpt.

. . .

Read more »

Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

June 1, 2006
By
Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

Chicago Magazine recently highlighted Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark: "Loyola history professor Timothy Gilfoyle captures all the soaring architectural drama, petty human squabbling, and commendable leadership behind the city’s newest civic jewel in Millennium Park, out this month. Right on time: The park celebrates its second anniversary in July."

Part park, part outdoor art museum, part cultural center, and part performance space, Millennium Park is now an unprecedented combination of distinctive architecture, monumental sculpture, and innovative landscaping. Gilfoyle’s thoroughly readable and lavishly illustrated history of Millennium Park is a wonderful testament to this twenty-first century landmark.

. . .

Read more »

Review: Bal, The Artemisia Files

May 23, 2006
By
Review: Bal, The Artemisia Files

The Art Book recently reviewed Mieke Bal’s The Artemisia Files: Artemisia Gentileschi for Feminists and Other Thinking People: "…despite their relative autonomy, each writer pays due deference to the others, with each essay cross-referencing others when appropriate. This, when the book is viewed as a whole, creates a unified work that is both satisfying and stimulating.… the accompanying illustrations are invaluable, and, although not in colour, are excellent quality for such a small volume."

One of the first female artists to achieve recognition in her own time, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653) became instantly popular in the 1970s when feminist art historians "discovered" her and argued vehemently for a place for her in the canon of Italian baroque painters. Featured alongside her father, Orazio Gentileschi, in a recent exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Artemisia has continued to stir interest though her position in the canon remains precarious, in part because her sensationalized life history has overshadowed her art. In The Artemisia Files, Mieke Bal and her coauthors look squarely at this early icon of feminist art history and the question of her status as an artist.

. . .

Read more »

Search for books and authors

Switch to our mobile site