Art and Architecture

Susan Bielstein on WVKR’s Library Cafe

March 22, 2007
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Susan Bielstein on WVKR’s Library Cafe

Susan Bielstein, author of Permissions, A Survival Guide: Blunt Talk about Art as Intellectual Property will appear on Library Café, a program on WVKR Independent Radio FM 91.3 in Poughkeepsie, NY, on March 27th at 11 am CST. Bielstein will join host Thomas Hill to discuss her book. You can tune in to a live broadcast online at the Library Café where they should also post archived audio after the show. Organized as a series of “takes” that range from short sidebars to extended discussions, Permissions, A Survival Guide explores intellectual property law as it pertains to visual imagery. How can you determine whether an artwork is copyrighted? How do you procure a high-quality reproduction of an image? What does “fair use” really mean? Is it ever legitimate to use the work of an artist without permission? Bielstein discusses the many uncertainties that plague writers who work with images in this highly visual age, and she does so based on her years navigating precisely these issues. As an editor who has hired a photographer to shoot an incredibly obscure work in the Italian mountains (a plan that backfired hilariously), who has tried to reason with artists’ estates in languages she . . .

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Views of the suburbs

February 20, 2007
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Views of the suburbs

Sunday’s San Jose Mercury News carried an interesting review of an exhibit at the San Jose Museum of Art. The exhibit gathers photographs, paintings, and sculpture on the theme of suburbia—so appropriate for the heart of Silicon Valley. The Mercury News reviewer, Alan Hess, takes the exhibit to task however, and juxtaposes what he sees as typical condescending attitude towards suburban development with the insights of one of our authors, Robert Bruegmann, whose book Sprawl: A Compact History works to overturn the conventional wisdom on suburbia. Hess writes: Vacant neighborhoods, sterile landscapes, and scary people dominate the exhibit “Suburban Escape: The Art of California Sprawl,” at the San Jose Museum of Art … . But until we stop repeating these myths—and stop basing architectural and planning policies on them—suburban cities such as San Jose will never achieve their full potential. Fortunately, some serious academics are taking a fresher look at the facts. A 2005 book with the catchy title Sprawl: A Compact History, by University of Illinois Professor Robert Bruegmann is one excellent antidote to decades of flawed opinions. As it happens though, we have dogs on both sides in this fight. The catalog for the exhibition, Suburban Escape: The . . .

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Press Release: Taylor, Mystic Bones

February 20, 2007
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Press Release: Taylor, Mystic Bones

In a December 2006 New York Times editorial (which we reprinted online), Mark C. Taylor wrote that his current manner of thinking and teaching “cultivate a faith in doubt that calls into question every certainty.” This philosophy is on elegant display in Taylor’s newest book, Mystic Bones. By combining images of weathered bones with philosophical aphorisms, Taylor refigures death in a way that allows life to be seen anew. These haunting photographs speak to themes of ruin, mortality, and ritual, and to a theology based on immanence rather than transcendence. At once a fine art book of great originality and a profound spiritual meditation, Mystic Bones is Taylor’s most personal statement yet of after-God theology. See the press release. . . .

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Review: Hyman, The Objective Eye

January 25, 2007
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Review: Hyman, The Objective Eye

John Hyman’s newest work, The Objective Eye: Color, Form, and Reality in the Theory of Art, addresses one of the perennial issues in art theory—the fascinatingly complex nature of pictorial representation. Here, Hyman makes a radical departure from recent trends in the philosophy of art to formulate what a review in the January 25 London Review of Books has called a “devastating critique of subjectivism”—all the while using “a complex array of texts and arguments from the full historical sweep of Western cultural reflection on the nature of pictorial art” to build his own “carefully nuanced” objectivist stance. But though the work of reformulating hundreds of years of theoretical writings in the arts might sound complicated, the London Review continues, “the rigorous clarity and elegant concision of Hyman’s writing—literary virtues to which the best analytical philosophy has always aspired—carry his reader through even the most difficult sections. No one will come away from this book without having learned a great deal about one of the most familiar mysteries of human culture.” And indeed, readers will find this an engaging critique of contemporary art theory a fascinating challenge to some of our most fundamental assumptions about the nature of pictorial representation. . . .

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Robert Bruegmann on KQED

January 22, 2007
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Robert Bruegmann on KQED

Robert Bruegmann will be making a guest appearance this morning on California public radio’s Forum with Michael Krasny. If you’re in Northern California you can catch Bruegmann discussing “California sprawl and its historical, economic and aesthetic roots and consequences” with other guests Ann Wolfe and Gabriel Metcalf on KQED 88.5 San Francisco today at 10:00. If you’re not, listen online; the program airs at 12:00pm central time. An audio archive of the program should be available on KQED’s website soon. Bruegmann is the author of the book Sprawl: A Compact History. In his incisive history of the expanded city, Bruegmann overturns every assumption we have about suburban sprawl. Taking a long view of urban development, he demonstrates that sprawl is neither recent nor particularly American but as old as cities themselves, just as characteristic of ancient Rome and eighteenth-century Paris as it is of Atlanta or Los Angeles. Nor is sprawl the disaster claimed by many contemporary observers. Although sprawl, like any settlement pattern, has undoubtedly produced problems that must be addressed, it has also provided millions of people with the kinds of mobility, privacy, and choice that were once the exclusive prerogatives of the rich and powerful. The first . . .

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When Buildings Speak

January 18, 2007
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When Buildings Speak

Yet another title in our art and architecture catalog has received some favorable press, this time in the Nota Bene section of the January 12 Chronicle of Higher Education. In Richard Byrnes’ piece on Anthony Alofsin’s recent book, When Buildings Speak: Architecture as Language in the Hapsburg Empire and Its Aftermath, he notes that the Hapsburg Empire “spoke… in many diverse languages in a highly politicized context…” but that—as Alofsin’s book demonstrates—this struggle for cultural authority was also “fought in bricks and blueprints.” Byrnes article quotes Alofsin as he explains: “A rich architectural polyglotism in Austria-Hungary paralleled the varied languages of its people… not only were many architectural languages expressed simultaneously, but they reflected various and even opposing issues of ethnic and national identity, as well as conservative or liberal ideologies.” Thus, in When Buildings Speak readers can see how the multiplicity of cultures living under Hapsburg rule sought to express their autonomy by tapping into the limitless possibilities of art and architectural styles. Lavishly illustrated with newly commissioned color photographs, When Buildings Speak is essential reading not only for students of architecture but for anyone wanting to better understand the complex history and politics of the Austro-Hungarian region under . . .

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Review: Moser, Wondrous Curiosities

January 16, 2007
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Review: Moser, Wondrous Curiosities

In a review written for the January 9th edition of The Independent Nicola Smyth praises Stephanie Moser’s new book, Wondrous Curiosities: Ancient Egypt at the British Museum, for its revealing look at the powerful role of museums in shaping our understanding of science, culture, and history. According to Smyth, Moser’s book is a fascinating study of the ways the British Museum has extended the domain of western culture by appropriating not only the physical objects in its collection—but their cultural significance as well. Citing artifacts gained through looting or as trophies of war, to the considerations of pattern and juxtaposition meant to manipulate viewer’s perspectives of the objects on display, Smyth writes: Moser makes a compelling case that, throughout its early history, the British Museum’s attitude to its ancient Egyptian artifacts reinforced one basic message: that the story of the ancient world was one of a rise from primitive beginnings to the classical perfection of ancient Greece. The story, in other words, of the triumph of western art.&hellip Moser presents a picture of an institution in which—in the early years at least—the Egyptian antiquities were badly presented in ill-lit and overcrowded chambers, uncontextualized, and contrasted unfavorably with the classical Greek . . .

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W.J.T. Mitchell: Chicagoan of the Year

January 10, 2007
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W.J.T. Mitchell: Chicagoan of the Year

Cultural critic Julia Keller named U of C professor W.J.T. Mitchell one of 2006’s Chicagoans of the Year. In a piece published December 31, 2006 for the Chicago Tribune, Keller gives a brief synopsis of why she thinks Mitchell stands out, calling him “Chicago’s renaissance man,” and a “restless and vivid thinker who goes where his passionate interests lead him.” Topping her list of his accomplishments is his book What Do Pictures Want?: The Lives and Loves of Images. Keller writes: This year brought fresh distinction to Mitchell’s scholarly expeditions. His latest book, What Do Pictures Want?… recently received the James Russell Lowell Prize from the Modern Language Association, the group’s annual award for best book. The citation lauded his “provocative and remarkably accessible collection of essays,” essays that consider aspects of the visual world such as monuments and paintings, advertising images and Dolly, the cloned sheep. Mitchell also reflects on the iconography of the World Trade Center and the meanings of 9/11. Mitchell’s new book is a wonderful addition to the large corpus of work he has already brought to the Press. Follow the links to find out more about some of our recent releases and web features from . . .

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Review: Scafi, Mapping Paradise

December 21, 2006
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Review: Scafi, Mapping Paradise

A recent review penned by the distinguished historian and scholar Anthony Grafton has much to say about Alessandro Scafi’s new book Mapping Paradise: A History of Heaven on Earth. Writing for The New Republic Grafton praises the book’s detailed historical account of the various attempts—made throughout the Middle Ages to the Renaissance—to chart the geographical location of paradise. Grafton writes: becomes a sort of erudite Virgil, leading the reader on an extraordinary journey through thousands of texts and maps—a journey that ends up teaching many lessons not only about the visions of the world but about tradition and how it operates.… Scafi’s patient and scrupulous exegeses tease out the meanings of icons and symbols, and record the immensely varied visual and verbal conventions that the mapmakers devised, and make clear the extraordinary conceptual richness and density of the maps of paradise. Mapping Paradise is itself a masterly map of concepts and images whose logic has been lost with time.… Mapping Paradise does honor to its author and his teachers, as well as to the generations of scribes and miniaturists, exegetes and theologians, whose colorful world it charts with lucidity and insight. . . .

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Book of the Year: Zamora, The Inordinate Eye

December 5, 2006
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Book of the Year: Zamora, The Inordinate Eye

Towards the end of each year the Times Literary Supplement solicits the opinions of some of their favorite authors and critics to recommend their personal picks for the Books of the Year. This year we are pleased to note that Marina Warner—a prolific novelist, historian, and critic—has chosen Lois Parkinson Zamora’s The Inordinate Eye: New World Baroque and Latin American Fiction as one of her picks. Warner says: It has been a lift to read Lois Parkinson Zamora’s The Inordinate Eye: New World Baroque and Latin American Fiction, beautifully produced by the University of Chicago Press. She argues exhilaratingly that an aesthetic of fusion, adornment and exuberance rose phoenix-like in the aftermath of the conquest, shaping an influential mode of fantasy, as in the art and architecture of Mexico and the marvelous fictions of Borges. The first study of its kind in scope and ambition, The Inordinate Eye is an extraordinary critique of the arts in Latin America. . . .

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