UCP News

“South Asia Across the Disciplines” on the web

October 27, 2009
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“South Asia Across the Disciplines” on the web

In January we announced the birth of the new series “South Asia Across the Disciplines”—a unique collaborative publication effort between Columbia University Press, the University of California Press, and the University of Chicago Press designed to increase publication opportunities for emerging scholars in the field. We recently unveiled a new website for the project offering more details, including a formal call for submissions and a list of forthcoming publications at www.saacrossdisciplines.org. According to the SAAD website: “South Asia Across the Disciplines” publishes work that aims to raise innovative questions in the field. These include the relationship between South Asian studies and the disciplines; the conversation between past and present in South Asia; the history and nature of modernity, especially in relation to cultural change, political transformation, secularism and religion, and globalization. Above all, the series showcases monographs that strive to open up new archives, especially in South Asian languages, and suggest new methods and approaches, while demonstrating that South Asian scholarship can be at once deep in expertise and broad in appeal. We invite manuscripts from art history, history, literary studies, philology or textual studies, philosophy, religion, and the interpretive social sciences, especially those that show an openness to disciplines . . .

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Bernard Harcourt wins the Laing Prize

April 16, 2009
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Bernard Harcourt wins the Laing Prize

Since 1963, the Press has awarded the annual Gordon J. Laing Prize to the Chicago faculty author, editor, or translator whose book has brought the greatest distinction to the Press’s list. This year, at a ceremony held earlier this month, the prize honored Bernard Harcourt, the Julius Kreeger Professor of Law and Professor in Political Science, for his book Against Prediction: Profiling, Policing and Punishing in the Actuarial Age. Harcourt’s book challenges the growing use of actuarial methods—from random security checks at airports to the use of risk assessment in sentencing—to determine whom law enforcement officials target and punish. The widely perceived success of these methods, he argues, has begun to distort our very conception of just punishment and to obscure alternate visions of social order. You can listen to Harcourt discuss his arguments in greater detail during this podcast of a talk he gave for the Chicago’s Best Ideas series at the University of Chicago Law School. As the new Chicago Chronicle notes today, Harcourt said of the prize itself that it was “extremely rewarding—and also very humbling—to receive this recognition from the community of scholars who I admire the most. A community that values ideas so intensely and . . .

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Happy Birthday Kate Turabian!

February 26, 2009
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Happy Birthday Kate Turabian!

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What does a publicist do? An interview with Levi Stahl

February 11, 2009
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What does a publicist do? An interview with Levi Stahl

Nigel Beale, author of the Nota Bene Books blog, recently posted the audio from an interesting interview he conducted with the press’s publicity manager, Levi Stahl. The interview offers a rare insider’s perspective on book marketing and publicity, touching on everything from coordinating book tours and dealing with the media, to writing promotional copy, to the industry’s shift towards online marketing strategies. The pair top off the interview with a discussion of Stahl’s recent efforts in getting the UCP to re-issue the Parker novels, Richard Stark’s famous hardboiled noir mystery series. Listen in on the discussion at Nigel Beale’s Nota Bene Books blog. . . .

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UCP wins big at AAUP Book, Jacket, and Journal Show

February 4, 2009
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UCP wins big at AAUP Book, Jacket, and Journal Show

Judging for the 2009 American Association of University Press’s Book, Jacket and Journal Show—a competition that recognizes meritorious achievement in the design, production, and manufacture of books, jackets, and journals by members of the university press community—took place last month at the AAUP Office in New York City. Approximately 289 books, 292 jacket and covers, and 7 journals competed, and 53 books, 36 jackets/covers, and one journal were chosen by the jurors as the very best examples from this pool of excellent design. The University of Chicago Press is proud to announce that it had eleven winning entries in the show. Congratulations to the winners! Design Category: Scholarly TypographicImages in Spite of All: Four Photographs from Auschwitz by Georges Didi-HubermanDesigner: Maia Wright Design Category: Scholarly IllustratedCutting a Figure:Fashioning Black Portraiture by Richard J. PowellDesigner: Matt Avery Design Category: Scholarly IllustratedThe Terezín Album of Mariánka Zadikow Annotated by Debórah DworkDesigner: Jill Simabukuro Design Category: Trade TypographicCollections of Nothing by William Davies KingDesigner: Jill Shimabukuro Design Category: Trade IllustratedThe Chicagoan: A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age by Neil HarrisDesigner: Maia Wright Design Category: Trade IllustratedSleeping Beauty: A One-Artist Dictionary by John Sparagana and Mieke BalDesigner: Jill Shimabukuro Design Category: Poetry and . . .

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The Great Chicago Book Sale a Great Success!

October 15, 2008
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The Great Chicago Book Sale a Great Success!

The University of Chicago Press held its first public book sale in 26 years on October 7 and 8 at International House in Hyde Park. Thousands of book lovers took this rare opportunity to buy Chicago books at deep discounts. With more than 20,000 books available—all at less than $5 each, the selection included everything from anthropology through zoology. The next sale will be held in 2034. (Just kidding.) . . .

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Our podcast debut

October 8, 2008
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Our podcast debut

We now do mp3. Chicago Audio Works is our new Press podcast, currently featuring interviews of our authors and certain to include archival audio, author readings, and other items of aural interest as we go along. Episode 1 is an interview with William Graebner, author of Patty’s Got a Gun: Patricia Hearst in 1970s America. Graebner takes us back to that queasy decade of the ’70s, an unstable age when an heiress could become an weapon-wielding revolutionary—and back again—in a matter of months. Graebner is interviewed by Gordon Buffonge. Chicago Audio Works is produced by Chris Gondek of Heron & Crane and the Invisible Hand. Episodes of Chicago Audio Works are available from iTunes and other digital media aggregators. See all audio and video available from the University of Chicago Press. . . .

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Seminary Co-op launches blog featuring UCP authors and editors

September 22, 2008
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Seminary Co-op launches blog featuring UCP authors and editors

Our friends at the Seminary Co-op Bookstores, 57th Street Books, and the Newberry Library Bookstore have launched an exciting new blog, The Front Table, and have already featured two University of Chicago Press personalities! Steve Tomasula, author of VAS: An Opera in Flatland, offers a reading list that includes our own Girly Man by L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E poet-extraordinaire Charles Bernstein. And UCP assistant editor Rodney Powell contributes an essay on the making of Roger Ebert’s new book, Scorsese by Ebert. It’s a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes and a true testament to the labor of love that produced the book. . . .

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Scholarly Publishing: Now on Video

July 2, 2008
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Scholarly Publishing: Now on Video

For decades digital technology has steadily transformed the business of academic publishing, but much of the digitization of the industry has, until more recently, gone on behind the scenes in the form of new printing technologies, databases, design and production tools, etc. Then in the mid-1990s the internet began to change how our customers find out about and purchase our books. And just as the textual media have been transformed by digitization, so the audiovisual media are being changed. Audio and video have become much easier to produce and distribute in the age of digital cameras, formats, and online distribution channels. No surprise that as our readership encounters more and more visual media online, that is where we—and our university press comrades—want to be found. The higher education media are taking note of the trend. . . .

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Google’s laser beam

May 19, 2008
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Google’s laser beam

Forty-eight years ago last Friday, Theodore Maiman demonstrated the first laser at the Hughes Research Laboratory in California. We could have written a blog post about that. Turns out we didn’t have to. Last Friday Google had a special logo to mark the anniversary. A click on the logo executed a web search for “first laser” and the first search result was a book excerpt we created five years ago for A Century of Nature: Twenty-One Discoveries that Changed Science and the World. The ensuing traffic was incredible. Our website had almost half a million visitors last Friday, more than 25 times the traffic of the previous Friday. The uptick in traffic actually began about 6pm CDT on Thursday, as the clock turned to Friday in the Far East, and continued into the first few hours of Saturday. A “Google day” appears to last about 44 hours. Numbers like this are, of course, a testament to the worldwide reach and popularity of Google. They also testify to the boundless extent of human curiosity. . . .

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