Author Events

Printers Row Book Fair

June 2, 2006
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Printers Row Book Fair

No plans for the weekend? Well, it’s supposed to be beautiful, and what better way to spend the day then wandering along Dearborn Street buying books?! The Printer’s Row Book Fair takes place this weekend, and the University of Chicago Press will be there selling books in tent A at the corner of Congress and Dearborn. Press authors will also be represented in the events this weekend. Stuart Dybek, author of Childhood and other Neighborhoods speaks Sunday at 2 pm at the Harold Washington Library; Joel Greenberg, author of A Natural History of the Chicago Region speaks Saturday at 12:30 p.m. at Grace Place/2nd floor; James Grossman, editor of The Encyclopedia of Chicago appears at 11 a.m. Sunday in the University Center/Lake Room, and Louise Knight, author of Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy, speaks at 1 p.m. on Saturday in the University Center/Lake Room. Of course, there are many more scheduled events, including appearances by John Updike, Dave Eggers, Nikki Giovanni, and Curious George—not currently scheduled to appear together, but who knows what can happen on Chicago streets at a book fair on a beautiful weekend in June? For a full schedule of events with a map . . .

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Author event: Timmermans on BBC Radio 4

May 24, 2006
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Author event: Timmermans on BBC Radio 4

Earlier today, Stefan Timmermans, author of Postmortem: How Medical Examiners Explain Suspicious Deaths, appeared on BBC Radio 4’s "Thinking Allowed" program. You can listen to an audio file of the program on the Thinking Allowed Web site. Postmortem goes deep inside the world of medical examiners to uncover the intricate web of pathological, social, legal, and moral issues in which they operate. Stefan Timmermans spent years in a medical examiner’s office, following cases, interviewing examiners, and watching autopsies. While he relates fascinating cases here, he is also more broadly interested in the cultural authority and responsibilities that come with being a medical examiner. . . .

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Symposium in Honor of Anthony C. Yu

May 22, 2006
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Symposium in Honor of Anthony C. Yu

On May 27 and 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the University of Chicago is hosting a symposium in honor of Professor Anthony C. Yu (1025 E. 58th Street). Yu is translator and editor of the Journey to the West series and the forthcoming abridgment of The Journey to the West titled The Monkey and the Monk. The symposium, Pleasure and Passion in Chinese Literature, will gather Yu’s student’s friends, and colleagues in Chinese and Comparative literature whose work has been influenced by his scholarship. Anthony C. Yu’s celebrated translation of The Journey to the West reinvigorated one of Chinese literature’s most beloved classics for English-speaking audiences when it first appeared thirty years ago. Yu’s abridgment of his four-volume translation, The Monkey and the Monk, finally distills the epic novel’s most exciting and meaningful episodes without taking anything away from their true spirit. . . .

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Author event: DeLue at the University of Chicago

May 10, 2006
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Author event: DeLue at the University of Chicago

On May 11 at 4:30 p.m., Rachel DeLue, author of George Inness and the Science of Landscape will lecture at the University of Chicago’s Cochrane-Woods Art Center (5540 S. Greenwood Avenue). Her lecture is titled "Diagnosing Pictures: The Science of Looking in America circa 1900." The event is free and open to the public. George Inness (1825-94), long considered one of America’s greatest landscape painters, has yet to receive his full due from scholars and critics. Rachael Ziady DeLue’s George Inness and the Science of Landscape—the first in-depth examination of Inness’s career to appear in several decades—demonstrates how the artistic, spiritual, and scientific aspects of Inness’s art found expression in his masterful landscapes. . . .

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Pacyga discusses immigrant movements on WBEZ

May 3, 2006
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Pacyga discusses immigrant movements on WBEZ

Yesterday, Dominic A. Pacyga appeared on WBEZ radio’s Eight Forty-Eight program to give his perspective on this week’s immigrant rally and how it compares to past immigrant movements in Chicago. Pacyga, an expert on immigrant and labor history, is author of Polish Immigrants and Industrial Chicago: Workers on the South Side, 1880-1922. This book explores the lives of immigrants in two iconic South Side Polish neighborhoods—the Back of the Yards and South Chicago—and the stockyards and steel mills in which they made their living. Listen to an audio file of the program by scrolling down to May 2, 2006. . . .

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Zizek lecture at the University of Chicago

April 19, 2006
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Zizek lecture at the University of Chicago

On April 19 at 4:00 p.m., Slavoj Zizek, documentary film star, Critical Inquiry visiting professor, and co-author of The Neighbor: Three Inquiries in Political Theology, will present another lecture at the University of Chicago. This week’s lecture, "The Uses and Misuses of Violence," will take place at the Max Palevsky Cinema (1212 E. 59th Street). The event is free and open to the public. In The Neighbor, three of the most significant intellectuals working in psychoanalysis and critical theory collaborate to show how the problem of neighbor-love opens questions that are fundamental to ethical inquiry and that suggest a new theological configuration of political theory. Their three extended essays explore today’s central historical problem: the persistence of the theological in the political. In "Towards a Political Theology of the Neighbor," Kenneth Reinhard supplements Carl Schmitt’s political theology of the enemy and friend with a political theology of the neighbor based in psychoanalysis. In "Miracles Happen," Eric L. Santner extends the book’s exploration of neighbor-love through a bracing reassessment of Benjamin and Rosenzweig. And in an impassioned plea for ethical violence, Slavoj Zizek’s "Neighbors and Other Monsters" reconsiders the idea of excess to rehabilitate a positive sense of the inhuman and . . .

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Mullaney on BBC Radio 4

April 13, 2006
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Mullaney on BBC Radio 4

Yesterday, Jamie L. Mullaney discussed her new book Everyone Is NOT Doing It: Abstinence and Personal Identity on BBC Radio 4’s program "Thinking Allowed." Mullaney and host Laurie Taylor discussed abstinence and the significant role it plays in the formation of personal identity. In contrast to such earlier forms of abstinence as social protest, entertainment, or an instrument of social stratification, not doing something now gives people a more secure sense of self by offering a more affordable and manageable identity in a world of ever-expanding options. You can listen to an audio file of the program by visiting the Thinking Allowed Web site. . . .

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Harcourt on the "Language of the Gun"

April 12, 2006
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Harcourt on the "Language of the Gun"

Last week, Bernard Harcourt lectured at the University of Chicago Law School. His lecture was based on his book Language of the Gun: Youth, Crime, and Public Policy. In the book, Harcourt recounts in-depth interviews with youths detained at an all-male correctional facility, exploring how they talk about guns and what meanings they ascribe to them in a broader attempt to understand some of the assumptions implicit in current handgun policies. The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Blog features an audio file of Harcourt’s talk, along with slides that accompanied his presentation. . . .

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Author event: Zizek at the University of Chicago

April 12, 2006
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Author event: Zizek at the University of Chicago

On April 12 and April 19 at 4:00 p.m., Slavoj Zizek, Critical Inquiry visiting professor and co-author of The Neighbor: Three Inquiries in Political Theology, will present two lectures at the University of Chicago (1126 E. 59th Street). The April 12 lecture is titled "The Ignorance of Chicken, or, Who Believes What Today." The April 19 lecture is titled "The Uses and Misuses of Violence." Both events are free and open to the public. In The Neighbor, three of the most significant intellectuals working in psychoanalysis and critical theory collaborate to show how the problem of neighbor-love opens questions that are fundamental to ethical inquiry and that suggest a new theological configuration of political theory. Their three extended essays explore today’s central historical problem: the persistence of the theological in the political. In "Towards a Political Theology of the Neighbor," Kenneth Reinhard supplements Carl Schmitt’s political theology of the enemy and friend with a political theology of the neighbor based in psychoanalysis. In "Miracles Happen," Eric L. Santner extends the book’s exploration of neighbor-love through a bracing reassessment of Benjamin and Rosenzweig. And in an impassioned plea for ethical violence, Slavoj Zizek’s "Neighbors and Other Monsters" reconsiders the idea of . . .

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Author event: Harcourt at U of C Law School

April 4, 2006
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Author event: Harcourt at U of C Law School

On April 5 at 12:15 p.m., Bernard Harcourt will speak at the University of Chicago Law School’s Fourth Annual Chicago’s Best Ideas series. Harcourt will lecture on "Language of the Gun: A Semiotic for Law & Social Science." The event is free and open to the public. Harcourt is author of Language of the Gun: Youth, Crime, and Public Policy. Legal and public policies concerning youth gun violence tend to rely heavily on crime reports, survey data, and statistical methods. Rarely is attention given to the young voices belonging to those who carry high-powered semiautomatic handguns. In Language of the Gun, Bernard E. Harcourt recounts in-depth interviews with youths detained at an all-malecorrectional facility, exploring how they talk about guns and what meanings they ascribe to them in a broader attempt to understand some of the assumptions implicit in current handgun policies. In the process, Harcourt redraws the relationships among empirical research, law, and public policy. We will publish Harcourt’s new book, Against Prediction: Profiling, Policing, and Punishing in an Actuarial Age, later this year. See our earlier post about the subject of that book. . . .

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