Press Releases

Press release: Bartsch, The Mirror of the Self

July 12, 2006
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Press release: Bartsch, The Mirror of the Self

Lustful Stoics, moral hypocrisy, divided selves—on Shadi Bartsch’s sexy and philosophical journey through classical notions of selfhood, we encounter all of these, plus much more. Exploring the links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge in the ancient world, Bartsch argues here that this unexpected ménage á trois has much to teach us about how the ancients understood what it meant to be a person. Read the press release. . . .

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Press release: Solzman, The Chicago River

July 7, 2006
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Press release: Solzman, The Chicago River

“In a strong sense, the river is Chicago,” David M. Solzman writes: running through the heart of downtown, it is a vehicle both for pleasure and for the industry that keeps Chicago humming. And with a brand new museum just opened in its honor, the river is enjoying a renaissance of sorts. The time is ripe, then, for this significantly expanded and thoroughly updated new edition of Solzman’s The Chicago River: An Illustrated History and Guide to the River and Its Waterways—a guidebook and historical narrative which explores both the river’s physical character and natural history. Read the press release. . . .

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Press release: Kruse, The New Suburban History

July 6, 2006
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Press release: Kruse, The New Suburban History

The ten essays in The New Suburban History are all written by historians on the cutting edge of an expanding field, and draw on original research on locales across the country, from California to Michigan to North Carolina. Paying special attention to the little-known histories of blue-collar, African American, Latino, and Asian suburbanites, the authors shed light on the role suburbs have played in the transformation of liberalism and conservatism; in the contentious politics of race, class, and ethnicity; and in debates about the environment, land use, taxation, and regulation. Read the press release. . . .

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Press release: Gennari, Blowin’ Hot and Cool

May 30, 2006
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Press release: Gennari, Blowin’ Hot and Cool

Whether they’re writing about art, food, movies, or music, critics have always been received with both awe and ire by their readers and by their subjects. This is also true in the world of jazz where the critic is responsible for putting into words an experience that is, more often that not, wordless. Yet their influence on the shape of the jazz tradition and the careers of the musicians is undeniable. It is also an aspect of the story of jazz which has before now been neglected in most accounts of its history. With Blowin’ Hot & Cool John Gennari corrects this oversight in a profound way by offering the first comprehensive overview of the critics’ role in the story of jazz over the course of the past seventy-five years. Read the press release. Read an excerpt about Leonard Feather and John Hammond; also see an outlined soundtrack to accompany the book. . . .

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Press release: Richerson, Not By Genes Alone

May 26, 2006
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Press release: Richerson, Not By Genes Alone

Not by Genes Alone offers a radical interpretation of human evolution. What makes us human, renowned scholars Peter J. Richerson and Robert Boyd demonstrate, lies in our psychology—more specifically, our unparalleled ability to adapt. Building their case with such fascinating examples as the Amish rumspringa and the gift exchange system of the !Kung San, Not by Genes Alone throws aside the conventional nature-versus-nurture debate and convincingly argues that culture and biology are inextricably linked. Read the press release. Read an excerpt. . . .

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Review: Brader, Campaigning for Hearts and Minds

May 24, 2006
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Review: Brader, Campaigning for Hearts and Minds

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries recently reviewed Ted Brader’s Campaigning for Hearts and Minds: How Emotional Appeals in Political Ads Work: "Brader guides the reader through the study of political advertising and makes the case that although many studies have been done, few have systematically analyzed the role of emotion in political campaigns. The author seeks to close this gap through content analysis of more than 1,400 political ads and an experimental investigation of the effect different types of ads have upon citizens. His work is both timely and original. The findings suggest that negatively charged ads cause citizens to conduct more research on their own. Enthusiastic appeals work to motivate committed voters to political action on behalf of their candidate. Brader notes at the onset that he has written his book to accessible beyond an academic audience. He manages to accomplish this feat and retain the rigor of a strong scholar. This book should be read by those interested in the art of political campaigning. Highly recommended." . . .

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Bevingtons’ gift to UCP for emerging scholars

May 5, 2006
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Bevingtons’ gift to UCP for emerging scholars

As a University of Chicago professor and peer reviewer, David Bevington has helped launch the careers of countless scholars in the humanities. On the eve of his retirement, David and his wife Peggy are extending this commitment even further with a $100,000 gift to the University of Chicago Press to help publish works from emerging scholars. David, the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Department of English, retired this year after teaching at the University for 38 years. He is a world renowned authority on English drama and literature from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance and has edited numerous editions of Shakespeare’s works. A warm and inspiring teacher, Bevington received the Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate teaching in 1979. Peggy also devoted her career to the University of Chicago community. An expert in early childhood education, she retired in 2003 after nearly three decades of teaching nursery school at the Laboratory Schools. As longtime friends of the Press, the Bevingtons see their gift as an extension of their ongoing involvement with and enthusiasm for Chicago’s academic publisher. David has been a driving force in building the Press’s reputation as a scholarly leader in early modern . . .

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Press release: Bal, A Mieke Bal Reader

May 4, 2006
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Press release: Bal, A Mieke Bal Reader

Always inspiring, sometimes maddening, consummately controversial, Mieke Bal has provoked and engaged thinkers around the world since she arrived on the intellectual scene more than thirty years ago. And now, the sparks that fly off the pages of her most influential pieces have converged to make cerebral fireworks. Encompassing Bal’s wide-ranging work in fields from critical theory and visual studies to narratology and feminist Bible scholarship, A Mieke Bal Reader brings together the best of her powerful essays, capturing a dynamic mind in peak form. Read the press release. . . .

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Press release: Richerson, Not By Genes Alone

May 3, 2006
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Press release: Richerson, Not By Genes Alone

Not by Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution offers a radical interpretation of human evolution, arguing that our ecological dominance and our singular social systems stem from a psychology uniquely adapted to create complex culture. Peter J. Richerson and Robert Boyd illustrate here that culture is neither superorganic nor the handmaiden of the genes. Rather, it is essential to human adaptation, as much a part of human biology as bipedal locomotion. Drawing on work in the fields of anthropology, political science, sociology, and economics—and building their case with such fascinating examples as kayaks, corporations, clever knots, and yams that require twelve men to carry them—Richerson and Boyd convincingly demonstrate that culture and biology are inextricably linked, and they show us how to think about their interaction in a way that yields a richer understanding of human nature.… Read the press release. Read an excerpt. . . .

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Press release: Smith, Reading Leo Strauss

May 1, 2006
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Press release: Smith, Reading Leo Strauss

The name of Leo Strauss is everywhere, from national newspapers and magazines to innumerable political blogs. Most of these media have perpetuated the idea that Strauss’s work molded the opinions of neoconservative foreign-policy hawks connected with the Bush administration. But in Reading Leo Strauss, Steven Smith recasts the renowned philosopher’s thought in a more nuanced light, portraying him not as the father of neoconservatism but instead as an ardent defender of liberal democracy.… Read the press release. Read an excerpt. . . .

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