Chicago

Knight on C-SPAN Book TV

June 14, 2006
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Knight on C-SPAN Book TV

On Sunday, June 18 at 1:15 pm (CST), C-SPAN2’s Book TV will feature a program from the 2006 Printers Row Book Fair, which features Louise W. Knight, author of Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy and Katherine Joslin discussing Jane Addams. Jane Addams was the first American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Now Citizen, Louise W. Knight’s masterful biography, reveals Addams’s early development as a political activist and social philosopher. In this book we observe a powerful mind grappling with the radical ideas of her age, most notably the ever-changing meanings of democracy. Read an excerpt. . . .

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Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

June 12, 2006
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Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

Sunday’s edition of the Chicago Sun-Times featured a nice review of Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark. Kevin Nance wrote, "The creation of the $475 million park, which opened in July 2004 four years late and at more than twice its originally projected cost, was fraught with tension among its high-powered participants.… This high-stakes game of push-and-pull forms the dramatic core of historian Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s absorbing and lavishly illustrated Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark, to be published this week." . . .

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Printers Row Book Fair

June 2, 2006
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Printers Row Book Fair

No plans for the weekend? Well, it’s supposed to be beautiful, and what better way to spend the day then wandering along Dearborn Street buying books?! The Printer’s Row Book Fair takes place this weekend, and the University of Chicago Press will be there selling books in tent A at the corner of Congress and Dearborn. Press authors will also be represented in the events this weekend. Stuart Dybek, author of Childhood and other Neighborhoods speaks Sunday at 2 pm at the Harold Washington Library; Joel Greenberg, author of A Natural History of the Chicago Region speaks Saturday at 12:30 p.m. at Grace Place/2nd floor; James Grossman, editor of The Encyclopedia of Chicago appears at 11 a.m. Sunday in the University Center/Lake Room, and Louise Knight, author of Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy, speaks at 1 p.m. on Saturday in the University Center/Lake Room. Of course, there are many more scheduled events, including appearances by John Updike, Dave Eggers, Nikki Giovanni, and Curious George—not currently scheduled to appear together, but who knows what can happen on Chicago streets at a book fair on a beautiful weekend in June? For a full schedule of events with a map . . .

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Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

June 1, 2006
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Review: Gilfoyle, Millennium Park

Chicago Magazine recently highlighted Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark: "Loyola history professor Timothy Gilfoyle captures all the soaring architectural drama, petty human squabbling, and commendable leadership behind the city’s newest civic jewel in Millennium Park, out this month. Right on time: The park celebrates its second anniversary in July." Part park, part outdoor art museum, part cultural center, and part performance space, Millennium Park is now an unprecedented combination of distinctive architecture, monumental sculpture, and innovative landscaping. Gilfoyle’s thoroughly readable and lavishly illustrated history of Millennium Park is a wonderful testament to this twenty-first century landmark. . . .

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Gapers Block highlights The Encyclopedia of Chicago

May 12, 2006
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Gapers Block highlights The Encyclopedia of Chicago

Today, Gapers Block highlights the Encyclopedia of Chicago Web site. Brush up on Chicago trivia by visiting the special features section of the site, which features essays, maps, photo galleries, indices, timelines, and tables. If you’re impressed by the Web site, be sure to check out The Encyclopedia of Chicago book. At 1152 pages, it’s the definitive historical reference on metropolitan Chicago. If you think you know how Chicago got its name, if you have always wondered how the Chicago Fire actually started and how it spread, if you have ever marveled at the Sears Tower or the reversal of the Chicago River—if you have affection, admiration, and appreciation for this City of the Big Shoulders, this Wild Onion, this Urbs in Horto, then The Encyclopedia of Chicago is for you. . . .

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Millennium Park’s "Bean" sculpture dedication

May 11, 2006
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Millennium Park’s "Bean" sculpture dedication

The Chicago Tribune reports that Millennium Park’s popular Cloud Gate sculpture (also known as “the Bean”) is set to be dedicated on May 15 at 11 a.m. The dedication ceremony will feature Cloud Gate sculptor Anish Kapoor, Chicago First Lady Maggie Daley, and music by jazz artist Orbert Davis. This June, the University of Chicago Press will publish Timothy J. Gilfoyle’s Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark. Part park, part outdoor art museum, part cultural center, and part performance space, Millennium Park is now an unprecedented combination of distinctive architecture, monumental sculpture, and innovative landscaping. Gilfoyle’s thoroughly readable and lavishly illustrated history of Millennium Park is a wonderful testament to this twenty-first century landmark. . . .

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Review: Knight, Citizen

May 10, 2006
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Review: Knight, Citizen

The New Republic recently praised Louise W. Knight’s Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy. From the review by Christine Stansell: "Louise W. Knight’s excellent book makes the case for Addams as a pre-eminent social thinker and a masterful politician.… Knight brings alive the sheer pleasure of .… While preserving Addams’s essential modesty, Knight is still able to show what a powerful operator she was becoming.… One hopes for a second volume of Knight’s fine work." This masterful biography explores how Addams was born to one life and chose another. Though raised in a small town, Addams was driven to become a pioneer in urban reform, working through the Hull House—which she co-founded—in Chicago and beyond as a leader in labor relations and an advocate for children, immigrants, and the poor. And though she was the product of a highly class-conscious and morally absolutist family and culture, she developed into one of our nation’s foremost pragmatic ethicists, on a par with Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and her good friend John Dewey. Read an excerpt. Visit Louise W. Knight’s Citizen Web site. . . .

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Pacyga discusses immigrant movements on WBEZ

May 3, 2006
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Pacyga discusses immigrant movements on WBEZ

Yesterday, Dominic A. Pacyga appeared on WBEZ radio’s Eight Forty-Eight program to give his perspective on this week’s immigrant rally and how it compares to past immigrant movements in Chicago. Pacyga, an expert on immigrant and labor history, is author of Polish Immigrants and Industrial Chicago: Workers on the South Side, 1880-1922. This book explores the lives of immigrants in two iconic South Side Polish neighborhoods—the Back of the Yards and South Chicago—and the stockyards and steel mills in which they made their living. Listen to an audio file of the program by scrolling down to May 2, 2006. . . .

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Review: Knight, Citizen

April 28, 2006
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Review: Knight, Citizen

The New York Review of Books recently praised Louise W. Knight’s Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy. From the review by Alan Ryan: " is enviably well-written and deeply engrossing, and a considerable addition to the literature, not just on an extraordinary woman, but on an extraordinary epoch.… Louise Knight has a particular talent for writing as though she knows at any point in the narrative no more than her heroine does of what is about to befall her next; it is a technique that suits her subject perfectly." Jane Addams was the first American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. This masterful biography reveals her early development as a political activist and social philosopher in lively detail and with deep appreciation for motive and character. In Citizen, we observe the powerful mind of a woman encountering the radical ideas of her age, most notably the ever-changing meanings of democracy. Read an excerpt. . . .

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Nelson Algren birthday party

March 21, 2006
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Nelson Algren birthday party

On March 25, at 8:00 p.m., the 18th Annual Nelson Algren Birthday Party will take place at Acme Art Works (1714 N. Western Avenue). Algren (1909-1981), author of Chicago: City on the Make, is being honored by the Nelson Algren Committee, a group dedicated to promoting interest in Algren, who "made Chicago his trade." The event will feature readings, music, a photographic exhibition, a drawing for Algren books and memorabilia, and of course, birthday cake. Ernest Hemingway once said of Nelson Algren’s writing that "you should not read it if you cannot take a punch." The prose poem, Chicago: City on the Make, filled with language that swings and jabs and stuns, lives up to those words. This 50th anniversary edition is newly annotated with explanations for everything from slang to Chicagoans, famous and obscure, to what the Black Sox scandal was and why it mattered. More accessible than ever, this is, as Studs Terkel says, "the best book about Chicago." We also publish H. E. F. Donohue’s Conversations with Nelson Algren, a collection of frank and often devastating conversations in which Algren reveals himself with all the gruff humor, deflating insight, honesty, and critical brilliance that marked his career. . . .

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