Reference and Writing

The Bible of the Publishing Industry and its #1 Evangelist

August 23, 2010
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The Bible of the Publishing Industry and its #1 Evangelist

Anita Samen, one of the many brilliant minds behind the new sixteenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style—and as managing editor at the press, also one of its foremost devotees, evangelists, and hermeneutists—made an appearance on WTTW’s Chicago Tonight last Thursday to discuss the new 16th edition and the updated CMOS online website. Check out the archived video below: See more about the book or check out some of the various subscription options for the Chicago Manual of Style Online. Or, get started by sampling some of the free content offered on the site including the Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide and the ever popular Q&A. . . .

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CMOS 16 Goes Digital

August 20, 2010
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CMOS 16 Goes Digital

And we’re live! The evening of August 17, Press IT staff flipped the so-called switch, and The Chicago Manual of Style Online, 16th Edition, was successfully launched to much fanfare from editors, writers, and style mavens alike. As the very first edition to be published simultaneously in print and online, this revision begins a fresh chapter in the hundred-year history of the venerable Manual. Much has changed since the last edition came out in 2003, and the sixteenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style has been reorganized to reflect the way publishing professionals work in the digital age. Replete with the clear, well-considered advice on style and usage that devotees of The Chicago Manual of Style have come to expect, the sixteenth edition also provides a wealth of new information and guidelines for electronic workflow and processes. After the launch, The Chicago Manual of Style Online subscribers automatically received the sixteenth-edition content update, while retaining their access to the fifteenth-edition content. Garrett Kiely, director of the Press, explains why. “We took this unusual step of keeping the previous edition available in our online product because of the way editors and authors work. Many will be involved in projects that . . .

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CMOS 16: Paper vs. pixels

August 17, 2010
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CMOS 16: Paper vs. pixels

It’s unofficially here! Though the official publication date is set for the 31, the new Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition rolled in to our warehouses not long ago, and then began rolling right back out the door and into the waiting hands of wordsmiths across the globe. Meanwhile our IT department officially flips the switch on the updated Chicago Manual of Style Online later on this evening—the first ever simultaneous release of both a physical and digital edition of the CMOS. This is certainly a cause for celebration, but with the increasing popularity of the online experience, one might begin to ponder the future of the CMOS‘s physical incarnation. Will we ever see a day in which most editors opt for mouse clicks and full text searches over thumbing through tables of contents and indexes? Though obviously embracing the digital medium, the New Yorker‘s Book Bench blogger Eileen Reynolds writes: Surely, someone must enjoy having the whole manual available at the click of of the mouse, but I’ll stick with the book. After spending so many hours squinting at a screen, trawling for information on the Internet, any excuse to pull a hefty tome off the shelf is a . . .

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For all those who didn’t know not “grounding your club in a bunker” was even a rule

August 16, 2010
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For all those who didn’t know not “grounding your club in a bunker” was even a rule

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Doing honest work in the digital age

August 3, 2010
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Doing honest work in the digital age

For those educated in a less digitized world, what constitutes plagiarism, and what does not, might seem fairly clear cut. But an article in yesterday’s New York Times notes that in an age where copyrighted intellectual property is available for the taking with the click of a button, and citing an original source can often mean digging through layer upon layer of tweets, re-tweets, blog posts, or RSS feeds, many students simply may not grasp the concept. From the Times: The Internet may… be redefining how students—who came of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking—understand the concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image. “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information is just out there for anyone to take.” So how does one go about avoiding the ignominious fate of the plagiarist? We recommend picking up a copy of Doing Honest Work in College: How to Prepare Citations, Avoid Plagiarism, and Achieve Real Academic . . .

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How do you cite a T-shirt?

June 4, 2010
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How do you cite a T-shirt?

The Chicago Manual of Style Online features a Q&A page, where the manuscript editors from the University of Chicago Press interpret the Manual’s recommendations and uncoil its intricacies. Our editors receive hundreds of submissions each month and a handful of the most helpful (not to mention entertaining) are selected for publication on the Chicago Style Q&A page. Occasionally there’s one too good not to reprint here: Q. How do you cite T-shirts? A. You could write, for example: Last week on Ellis Avenue I saw a T-shirt that said, “I keep pressing Escape but I’m still here.” That is, if you think it’s a good idea to cite a T-shirt. Anyone can post a question and access to the Q&A is free, so go ahead and ask all those hairsplitting questions about English grammar you’ve been dying to solve! While you’re at it, be sure to check out the loads of other free content like the tools for editors—a collection of sample forms, letters, and style sheets—as well as the Chicago Style Citation Quick Guide for help citing sources. Also follow the Chicago Manual of Style on Facebook and Twitter. . . .

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Everything you ever wanted to know about children

April 14, 2010
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Everything you ever wanted to know about children

Probably the most comprehensive book on children ever conceived, The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion contains more than 500 articles written by experts in their fields covering, as editor-in-chief Richard Shweder remarks in this recent article, “everything you ever wanted to know but never even thought to ask.” Shweder continues: “we wanted it to be authoritative, balanced, clear, lacking in jargon and appealing to a very broad group—everyone from parents to grandparents to lawyers to pediatricians to educators to social workers.” And indeed with entries providing concise and accessible synopses of the topics at hand, alongside over forty highly readable “Imagining Each Other” essays that focus on the particular experiences of children in different cultures, The Child is the definitive resource for all who work with children. To find out more read the article on the website of the State Journal Register, or navigate to this special website for the book offering a video of Shweder talking about the book, sample articles, and more. . . .

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The Child in the Tribune

December 29, 2009
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The Child in the Tribune

Heidi Stevens wrote about The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion in last Sunday’s edition of the Chicago Tribune. Stevens quotes editor-in-chief Richard A. Shweder who handily sums up the book: “It’s everything you ever wanted to know but never even thought to ask.” Everything in this case being more than 500 articles in a 1,144-page book that was 10 years in the making. Stevens also interviewed Mary Laur, senior project editor for reference books at the Press. A sidebar to the article notes five things learned from The Child, including this arresting fact: “Children in the U.S. are more likely to grow up with a pet than with both parents.” Sample pages, articles, and more is on our website for the book. . . .

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The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion on WGN’s Extension 720

November 30, 2009
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The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion on WGN’s Extension 720

WGN’s Milton J. Rosenberg recently invited several guests on his radio talk show Extension 720 to discuss the press’s recent publication of The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion—the definitive reference book for parents, social workers, researchers, educators, and others who work with children. Listen in as editor-in-chief Richard A. Shweder, contributor Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon, and house editor Mary Laur, talk about their new book and field questions from callers on the WGN Extension 720 website. Bringing together contemporary research on children and childhood from pediatrics, child psychology, childhood studies, education, sociology, history, law, anthropology, and other related areas, The Child contains more than 500 articles—all written by experts in their fields and overseen by a panel of distinguished editors led by anthropologist Richard A. Shweder—each providing a concise and accessible synopsis of the topic at hand. In addition to these topical essays, The Child also contains more than forty “Imagining Each Other” essays, which focus on the particular experiences of children in different cultures. Compiled by some of the most distinguished child development researchers in the world, The Child is an essential addition to the current knowledge on children and childhood. To find out more navigate to this special website for the . . .

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A Professional Perfectionist’s Best Friend

May 5, 2009
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A Professional Perfectionist’s Best Friend

The Subversive Copy Editor “may be the best copy editor’s companion since the CMS, the AP Style Guide and that dog-eared xerox of copy editing marks you keep tacked up on the cubicle wall,” is how Publishers Weekly begins its starred review of the magazine’s Web Pick of the Week. And PW is in the majority opinion. An article in Sunday’s Chicago-Sun Times also is full of appreciation for Saller’s “conversational style and insights into interactions between writers and copy editors,” which “make reading her book an entertaining trip even for those who never plan to lift a red pen or use the editing feature of a word-processing program.” That might sound surprising: editing guide as beside reading? But it will make perfect sense to anyone who’s had a taste of the indispensably helpful and pleasingly witty advice Saller has been dishing out for years for the Q&A feature of The Chicago Manual of Style Online. . . .

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