UCP News

Seminary Co-op launches blog featuring UCP authors and editors

September 22, 2008
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Seminary Co-op launches blog featuring UCP authors and editors

Our friends at the Seminary Co-op Bookstores, 57th Street Books, and the Newberry Library Bookstore have launched an exciting new blog, The Front Table, and have already featured two University of Chicago Press personalities! Steve Tomasula, author of VAS: An Opera in Flatland, offers a reading list that includes our own Girly Man by L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E poet-extraordinaire Charles Bernstein. And UCP assistant editor Rodney Powell contributes an essay on the making of Roger Ebert’s new book, Scorsese by Ebert. It’s a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes and a true testament to the labor of love that produced the book. . . .

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Scholarly Publishing: Now on Video

July 2, 2008
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Scholarly Publishing: Now on Video

For decades digital technology has steadily transformed the business of academic publishing, but much of the digitization of the industry has, until more recently, gone on behind the scenes in the form of new printing technologies, databases, design and production tools, etc. Then in the mid-1990s the internet began to change how our customers find out about and purchase our books. And just as the textual media have been transformed by digitization, so the audiovisual media are being changed. Audio and video have become much easier to produce and distribute in the age of digital cameras, formats, and online distribution channels. No surprise that as our readership encounters more and more visual media online, that is where we—and our university press comrades—want to be found. The higher education media are taking note of the trend. . . .

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Google’s laser beam

May 19, 2008
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Google’s laser beam

Forty-eight years ago last Friday, Theodore Maiman demonstrated the first laser at the Hughes Research Laboratory in California. We could have written a blog post about that. Turns out we didn’t have to. Last Friday Google had a special logo to mark the anniversary. A click on the logo executed a web search for “first laser” and the first search result was a book excerpt we created five years ago for A Century of Nature: Twenty-One Discoveries that Changed Science and the World. The ensuing traffic was incredible. Our website had almost half a million visitors last Friday, more than 25 times the traffic of the previous Friday. The uptick in traffic actually began about 6pm CDT on Thursday, as the clock turned to Friday in the Far East, and continued into the first few hours of Saturday. A “Google day” appears to last about 44 hours. Numbers like this are, of course, a testament to the worldwide reach and popularity of Google. They also testify to the boundless extent of human curiosity. . . .

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The business of books in the digital age

April 23, 2008
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The business of books in the digital age

Along with nearly every other facet of life, in the last decade the digital revolution has transformed the book publishing industry. As North America’s largest university press, Chicago has been one of the leaders in advancing the use of digital technology in publishing—a fact acknowledged in the cover story of this month’s Book Business magazine. Touching on everything from our short-run digital printing program, to the digital publishing services offered by BiblioVault, our digital content repository, Book Business‘s James Sturdivant talks to UCP director Garrett Kiely and Chicago Digital Distribution Center manager Jeanne Weinkle to learn how Chicago has extended its digital publishing initiatives into the twenty-first century. James Sturdivant writes for Book Business: Garrett Kiely a 20-year industry veteran who came on as the UCP’s 15th director in September 2007. Kiely arrived after an eight-year stint as president of Palgrave Macmillan, where he oversaw e-book conversion projects and other pioneering digital initiatives for a division focused on scholarly and reference titles. Such experience is crucial to the press’s innovative strategy for content distribution. The press offers print-on-demand and digital distribution to a range of academic publishers through its Chicago Distribution Services, positioning itself as the entity best able . . .

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A new joint publishing effort for South Asian studies

January 18, 2008
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A new joint publishing effort for South Asian studies

Columbia University Press, University of California Press, and the University of Chicago Press announce a new joint publishing effort in South Asian Studies. The University Presses of California, Chicago, and Columbia are pleased to announce that the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a grant to commence publication of a major book series covering South Asia. Titled “South Asia across the Disciplines” the new series aims to publish six monographs per year, in a collaborative effort across all three University Presses with each press publishing two series books per year. Each press has long-established roots in the field and is based at a university with outstanding South Asia faculty. In recent years, the market for South Asian studies books has declined along with the broader market for academic monographs in many fields, making it increasingly difficult for emerging scholars to get their work published. “South Asia across the Disciplines” will disseminate and promote new scholarship on South Asia by combining the efforts and resources of the three presses. . . .

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David P. Currie, 1936-2007

October 16, 2007
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David P. Currie, 1936-2007

David P. Currie, a constitutional scholar and professor at the University of Chicago Law School for 45 years, died yesterday in Chicago at the age of 71. Currie was the author of 19 books, and the University of Chicago Press was pleased to be the publisher of eight of them, including his magnificent works in the history of the Constitution of the United States. In the two volumes of The Constitution in the Supreme Court, The First Hundred Years and The Second Century, Currie delivered both legal analysis and a narrative history of the highest court’s interpretation of the Constitution. Currie turned to the legislative branch for his volumes of The Constitution in Congress. He analyzed the work of the first six Congresses in The Federalist Period and examined the period of Republican hegemony in The Jeffersonians. The antebellum years required two volumes: Democrats and Whigs, which covered the Jacksonian revolution and economic changes, and Descent into the Maelstrom, which was devoted to the great debate over slavery. Currie was working on the next volume in the series at the time of his death. For the bicentennial of the Constitution, Currie wrote a book for the student and lay audiences, . . .

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Chicago’s new director announced

July 4, 2007
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Chicago’s new director announced

Garrett P. Kiely has been named as the new Director of the University of Chicago Press. The news was released yesterday by the Office of the Provost. Kiely is an academic publishing veteran and currently President of Palgrave Macmillan (formerly St. Martin’s Press Scholarly & Reference Division). He will begin his duties as director at Chicago on September 1. At Palgrave, Kiely previously served as both Sales and Marketing Director, and as Vice President of the Scholarly and Reference Division. Kiely succeeds Paula Barker Duffy, who led the Press since 2000. Chris Heiser, Deputy Director of the Press, will serve as Interim Director, beginning July 1. . . .

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The Miss Manners of Chicago Style

June 1, 2007
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The Miss Manners of Chicago Style

Today’s issue of the the Chicago Reader—the Spring Books Special—has a nice little feature about the writer of The Chicago Manual of Style Q&A. But if you’re hoping that the identity of the Q&A writer will at long last be revealed to all the world … you’ll be disappointed to learn that the woman behind the wit of the Q&A has adopted a pseudonym, Jody Fisher. Every month new entries are published to the The Chicago Manual of Style Q&A. Here’s one from this month’s lot: Q. Is it really necessary to include “as” before “per”? For example, “Client has requested, as per original agreement, two hard copies of all reports.” Since “per” means “according to,” can’t we just delete the unnecessary (and wordy-looking) “as”? Thank you, great gurus, for your wisdom! A. It is not necessary to add “as.” In fact, it used to be considered incorrect, and sticklers still feel superior when they slash through it. . . .

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The 2006 Gordon J. Laing Prize

May 10, 2007
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The 2006 Gordon J. Laing Prize

At its award ceremony on Monday, April 30, the University of Chicago Press awarded the 2006 Gordon J. Laing Prize to W. J. T. Mitchell, the Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Service Professor of English and Art History, for his book What Do Pictures Want?: The Lives and Loves of Images. Awarded annually since 1963 by the Press, the Laing Prize is given to the Chicago faculty author, editor, or translator whose book has brought the greatest distinction to the Press’s list. In What Do Pictures Want? Mitchell explores the idea that images are not just inert objects that convey meaning but animated beings with desires, needs, appetites, demands, and drives of their own. The book highlights Mitchell’s innovative and profoundly influential thinking on picture theory and the lives and loves of images. Ranging across the visual arts, literature, and mass media, Mitchell applies characteristically brilliant and wry analyses to Byzantine icons and cyberpunk films, racial stereotypes and public monuments, ancient idols and modern clones, offensive images and found objects, American photography and aboriginal painting. Mitchell becomes only the third faculty member to win the Laing Prize twice; he also won the 1996 prize for Picture Theory: Essays on Verbal and Visual . . .

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CMOS Survey Prize Winners!

April 9, 2007
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CMOS Survey Prize Winners!

After months of anticipation the moment you’ve all been waiting for has arrived—the winners of the raffle hosted by The Chicago Manual of Style Online were announced today at approximately 3:00 pm Central Time in the boardroom of the University of Chicago Press. Not one but two lucky individuals were chosen at random from a pool of respondents to the recent CMOS Online survey. The winners receive up to one hundred dollars worth of free books from the Press, that’s right, one hundred dollars worth of FREE BOOKS. Choosing the winning tickets was none other than Director of the Books Division of the Press, Mr. Bob Lynch. In his press release, Mr. Lynch stated that he was pleased to present the awards on behalf of the CMOS staff and thanked the lucky winners for their time spent helping to improve the CMOS Online user experience. Congratulations! . . .

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